2 really bad requests today

Originally Posted By: jremas
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I just had a request from a guy who wants me to come into his home and write a report stating that there is no mold in his home. Apparently he for some unknown reason told his refinance company that there was mold in his home and now they won’t refinance until he gets a clean bill of health. Originally he wanted me to come out a few weeks ago to see if the “levels” of mold in his home would require replacement of carpeting and furniture. I told him the EPA has no “levels” established and referred him to a “mold specialist” closer to his area. Like I want to be in court for that in a couple of months…wheeewwwww!


2nd call was for a client who had a pressure tank that was so badly rusted, the pressure gauge was not even working because of the rust inside that. I wrote it up as excessive rust/near end of life-span/further have a contractor of that specialty evaluate for repair. I also wrote up the water heater (rusted to all heck) because it was not working. Same comments. He called me today because his lender wants me to change the wording stating that the pressure tank and the water heater will last at least 2 years!! OK, I don't feel like buying a pressure tank and water heater this year.

What is up with this non-sense??

I am now coming upon other problems where the client cannot close because the insurance companies won't write the insurance until some of the items get fixed. I am starting to see deals fall through where folks buy a property "as is" and cannot close because they cannot get insurance. One more obstacle. In PA they will have to write a new clause for "Insurance Contingency" where the sale is dependent upon the buyer obtaining insurance.

Maybe we won't come across as the bad guys anymore after the lenders and insurance companies sent their guys out for their inspection.


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Jeff Remas
REMAS Inspections, Inc.
Northeastern PA & the Poconos
www.NEPAinspector.com

570-362-1598

Originally Posted By: arosenbaum
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Deleted post…


I'VE GONE TO FAR!!!

I've learned my lesson, though


Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
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Well Jeff,


I'm glad to see you didn't get caught up in that in an effort to help your client.

A lot of mortgage and insurance companies are now asking to look at the report and asking for changes before carrying thru on financing or insurance.

My response to the client in this case would have been that they needed to get a licensed plumber ( a specialist ) to give them that documentation but, I doubt one would.


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Erby Crofutt
B4U Close Home Inspections
Georgetown, Kentucky

www.b4uclose.com

Originally Posted By: rray
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Since I live in a high fire hazard area and a seismic area, insurance contingencies are quite common here. However, I am running into more and more insurance companies wanting copies of the home inspection reports and requesting certain repairs before they will issue insurance. Most of it involves plumbing problems and substandard electric (less than 100 amps service, fuses, and certain brand electric panels). My own insurance agent had some Federal Pacific Electric, Bulldog Pushmatic, Zinsco, Siemens, and Sylvania electric panels on his list when I got insurance a year ago.


Originally Posted By: jwalker
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Erby & Russell,


How do you handle the request from the insurance provider for a copy of "THE REPORT".


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James Walker

Our Service Is A Long Term Investment!

OneSource Real Estate Inspections
DFW, Texas
www.dfwhomeinspector.com

Originally Posted By: rray
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I provide two printed copies to the Client’s agent and email copies to Client and Client’s Realtor. I provide no other copies to anyone, so any calls coming in from listing agents, insurance companies, etc., are referred to Client’s Realtor. If they balk, I simply tell them that I have a legally binding contract between my Client and my company as far as what I provide and to whom I provide it. That usually gets them off the phone pretty quickly.


Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
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Any information they want must come from my client. If they want a copy of the report, they need to talk with my client and get it from them.



Erby Crofutt


B4U Close Home Inspections


Georgetown, Kentucky



www.b4uclose.com

Originally Posted By: jwalker
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As I thought, thanks for the reply.



James Walker


Our Service Is A Long Term Investment!

OneSource Real Estate Inspections
DFW, Texas
www.dfwhomeinspector.com

Originally Posted By: George Moomaw
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The insurance companies are looking to pass off some liability.


Last May I did an inspection for a young couple. The composite shingle roof was in VERY bad condition and I wrote it up as in need of immidiate replacement. These kids bought the house anyway.

About 2 months later, I recieved a call from their insurance company (State Farm) asking for a copy of the inspection report. I politely explained why I could/would not provide it and suggested that they call thier client for a copy.

About a month ago, the client called me and ask for a letter to State Farm stating that the roof will last at least another two years. Of coarse I did not provide it. Last week the client recieved a cancellation notice from State Farm

At their request, I called the insurance company to ask why the policy was not "rated" or excluded water damage or something like that, insted of flat out cancellation. The answer was scary .... " we are looking to limit our liability by sharring it"

Proceed with caution