Air sample

If there is a section of a room that is contained with 6mil plastic and has been remediated, should you still use the recommended 5 liters per 5 min (z5) air sample or should you adjust the timing to determine the effectiveness of the remediation?

There is manufacturer’s instructions that comes with your air cassettes. I recommend you read them. Below is what I pulled from a website. http://www.reliablelab.com/Z5_sampling-Cassette.php

The Z5 sampling cassette is a cost effective, first-line mold screening tool that efficiently and reliably collects mold. It can be easily used by home inspectors to get preliminary information on whether a mold problem may exist and further investigation is warranted.

Notice the word “peliminary” is used. You are using the wrong cassette. Use a cassette that allows 150 cubic liters of air to be pulled thorough it. And the main thing is go back to school. It takes more than a few days in school, before you should be clearing any mold remediation job. At least you had enough sense to ask, before doing it wrong.

Depends on the room conditions. But assuming that the remediation was done properly the room should be relatively clean and dust free. Since this is typically the case it should have a total of 150 ML of air, or 15ML for 10 minutes.

This is a clearance test, not a preliminary test. There should be a clearance report and test conducted. Ensure that the equipment is calibrated before EACH sample, the samples were contained in a proper manner to prevent cross contamination.

Clearance testing is not just air quality sampling it is also a visual inspection and to ensure that proper methods were conducted during the remediation. Also, outside the containment zone should be tested to ensure during the remediation they did not contaminate the areas that were originally acceptable (if they were in fact tesasted and deemed acceptable).

But to answer your question, NO 25 ML of air is not a sufficient amount of air for a post test and is very inaccurate and please be sure to determine how much of the sample the lab reads. Many leabs read only 1/3 the sample and then jsut guess at the rest.