Almost grabbed it...

Almost pulled this lamp cord out to test the receptacle. Can you see the bare copper?

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yikes. just lick you fingers (for more grip) and pull it out QUICK.

Exactly why AFCI’s are being required. . .

yeah, you can get much better grip when it’s on an AFCI.:roll: :mrgreen:

I was standing in a wet basement the other day and reached up to pull a metal light switch chain and stopped…
I checked it and it was powered.

both good examples of why to wear good electrically rated boots. Joe you could have grabbed that thing all day and not felt a thing, as long as there were no other parts of your body touching a different potential.

Bruce, do you mean it lit up your non contact probe? Did you know that your non contact probe will light up when you hold it to the metal parts of a fixture or appliance with no equipment ground, even though there is no fault? And if you touch your other hand to the metal part, the probe will go out. I think the term is Inductive Capacitance.

I heard a beeping in my tool pouch at my last inspection…my probe is hanging by my side on the outside of my pouch…it kept going off…as I was walking around. I never did figure out what it was causing it…I think it may have been my cell phone in the pocket next to it…

Yep…Prime example as Jeff stated by AFCI’s are being used…also just remember guys…it only takes 1/10th of an AMP to kill you…the minimum circuit in a house you will be exposed to is 15 Amps…THINK about that for a second…Safety Rules !!!

Um, I think if you guys are talking about personel protection you mean to say GFCI an AFCI is (as you both know well) more for preventing fire from arcing. GFCI are for protecting people from electrocution.
Simply wearing good boots and not having other points of contact needs to be stressed here. Non electricians sometimes don’t get that. Bruce and Joe could have grabbed the hot wire and/or hot fixture and never been injured or even felt a tingle if there is no path to a different potential.
I fail to see what AFCI has to do with this.

Branch/Feeder AFCI - This device is installed at the origin of a branch circuit or feeder, such as at a panelboard, to provide AFCI parallel arc protection of the branch or feeder circuit wiring. This device also protects against a parallel arc in the cord sets and power supply cords. This is the device that is required by the NEC.

Now I will be the first to admit…lol…this MAY be a Series Arc Potential issue…but at any point a GROUND can be added to this situation if something that is grouded is placed against it…and left their…so really just a promo for AFCI’s…I pray at some point they also protect series as well even if ALONE they do not produce enough heat to cause a issue.

Arcing faults can occur in one of two ways, series arcing faults or parallel arcing faults, but the most dangerous of these is the parallel arc. A series arc can occur when the conductor in series with the load is unintentionally broken. Examples might be a frayed conductor in a cord that has pulled apart or a loose connection to a receptacle or in a splice. A series arc is load limited, such that arc current cannot be greater than the load the conductor serves. Current with an arc in series has a lower rms value than current without the arc due to extinction and re-ignition. Typically, series arcs do not cause enough heat to create a fire.

Parallel arcing faults either occur in two ways, either a short circuit or a ground fault.
Short-Circuit Arc. A short circuit arc might occur if the wire insulation is cut by a staple or a cord is cut by a metal table placed on it. The current flow of a short-circuit arc is only limited by the system impedance and the impedance of the fault itself. A ground fault arc can occur only when a ground path is present, and this fault can be cleared by either GFCI or AFCI protection device. The rms current value for parallel arc faults, will be considerably less than that of a solid fault, and a typical 15 A might not clear this fault before a fire is ignited.

While I think we agree on the protection for personal lives…I think BOTH me and Jeff thread shifted a little…showing a PRIME example for the promotion of AFCI protection devices…:slight_smile:

Sorry…just found a place to promote AFCI’s…sorry…:slight_smile:

Point being " Short-Circuit Arc. A short circuit arc might occur if the wire insulation is cut by a staple or a cord is cut by a metal table placed on it."

A ground fault arc can occur only when a ground path is present, and this fault can be cleared by either GFCI or AFCI protection device. The rms current value for parallel arc faults, will be considerably less than that of a solid fault, and a typical 15 A might not clear this fault before a fire is ignited.

Thanks Paul.

Good info! :slight_smile:

Yea, what he said :cool:

I wasn’t referring to protecting the inspector, but rather, the occupants of the home. . .

Yeah…I agree with what Jeff said…:slight_smile:

I stand by my point that AFCI protection has little to with this thread. Joe was saying he almost grabbed the plug and I’m saying proper electrical safety practices would have kept him safe even if he had. As for protecting the occupants, an AFCI might do that, but that is not its primary function. Personel protection is the function of a GFCI.

Hmm…so you DO NOT want someone within the INDUSTRY who see’s a chance to explain the function of AFCI’s and how this EXACT image can be a perfect time to explain the AFCI function.

I think HE already knew NOT to grab it…he was letting everyone see not asking SHOULD i grab it…I SEE nothing wrong with taking the moment to explain what Mr. Pope stated about AFCI’s to better EDUCATE the members who MAY need it…

Not sure I see your problem with that quite frankly…

I do not unplug cords in peoples homes.:slight_smile:

What then do you believe the primary purpose of an AFCI to be?

yep…and since you dont…personal protection does not become a issue here for the HI if you dont unplug cords…BUT if you saw that would it NOT be a good time to promote AFCI protection…if you knew WHY to promote it…:)…

Sure you would…YOU Be a GOOD inspector…:slight_smile: