Arsenic treated lumber

Originally Posted By: dosborn
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I have an upcoming inspection that the buyer says has a wood foundation that has been treated with arsenic. I have not heard of this before… can anyone give me an idea about this and if it causes health hazard for the people moving in…???


Dan Osborn
Upstate Home Inspection Service


Originally Posted By: rhinck
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Dan,


Go online to the American Plywood Assoc. of America and read their info regarding treated wood foundations. I think you'll find your answers.


Rick


Originally Posted By: jcampbell
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Telephone poles and railroad ties used to be treated the same way… you should be all set as long as you do not chew on it… but I agree check with the above website…



Jeffrey S. Campbell


http://www.maineshomeinspector.com

Originally Posted By: phinsperger
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Heard of a story where an older couple built their home entirely out of treated lumber. One of them (can’t remember if husband or wife) got very sick and was unable to communicate anything to the doctors. Doctors found great amounts of arsenic in the body. Authorities were alerted and spouse was arrested on suspicion of poisoning their mate. It wasn’t until blood work was done on the arrested spouse also showed high levels of arsenic that charges were dropped and the true sources was identified - the house.


I doubt they were "chewing" on the house. I wonder though if the arsenic was from normal living activities or perhaps they were present or did a lot of the construction themselves without proper protection. Inhaling the dust from cutting or sanding of treated lumber is a no no. ![eusa_naughty.gif](upload://nYl3dmRmAIH81yCdH9V96akYnNa.gif)

If they are on a well water, I would be sure to have the water tested.


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Paul Hinsperger
Hinsperger Inspection Services
Chairman - NACHI Awards Committee
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Originally Posted By: roconnor
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I think they mean CCA treated lumber (CCA stands for Chromated Copper Arsenate). It was an extremely common preservative for pressure treating lumber for the longest time, and was only recently replaced by a newer preservative called ACQ. But ACQ has it’s own problems … like corrosion of fasteners, unless stainless steel or heavy hot-dip galvanized screws and nails are used.


I understand that the biggest concerns were handling and cutting CCA treated lumber, and it could give ya some pretty nasty splinters (originally banned for playground equipment and benches, then almost totally replaced by ACQ). But who really knows for sure. These sites have some pretty good info:

http://www.awpa.com/
http://www.woodpreservativescience.org/


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Robert O'Connor, PE
Eagle Engineering ?
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NACHI Education Committee

I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong