ASHI

Originally Posted By: Tom Logan
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Lets say Joe goes to the Doctor on May 23, 2003. Doctor Kelly writes Joe’s diagnosos in a typed report.


Now Joe moves to another part of town on July 4, 2003. Joe feels a little under the weather. Joe had all his medical records sent to his new doctor Lardo.

Question? Should doctor Lardo treat Joes based on Joe's last medical examination by doctor Kelly or should doctor Lardo re-examine Joe?


TL


Originally Posted By: tgardner
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In Virginia, a Virginia certified Home inspector, by law, cannot accept monies from more than one individual or company for the same inspection unless it is agreed to in writing by all parties. That in my opinion, would prohibit an inspector from selling the same report more than once (unless the original client said and signed a release that it was OK).


TG


Originally Posted By: jhagarty
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deleted.



Joseph Hagarty


HouseMaster / Main Line, PA
joseph.hagarty@housemaster.com
www.householdinspector.com

Phone: 610-399-9864
Fax : 610-399-9865

HouseMaster. Home inspections. Done right.

Originally Posted By: rray
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. . .


Originally Posted By: Tom Logan
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ADD TO THE COE THE FOllOWING


"A real estate agent or any other person or company cannot use and/or sell a home inspection report to another prospective buyer unless he or she has written consent from the owner of the original report in question"


TM


Originally Posted By: jhagarty
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deleted



Joseph Hagarty


HouseMaster / Main Line, PA
joseph.hagarty@housemaster.com
www.householdinspector.com

Phone: 610-399-9864
Fax : 610-399-9865

HouseMaster. Home inspections. Done right.

Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
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In PA the seller does not need to get permission. He has a right to the report (in most cases) by law. This from the PA Home Inspction Law:


"The seller shall have the right, upon request, to receive without charge a copy of a home inspection report from the person for whom it was prepared."

Note though, the seller has to get it from your client.

Nick


Originally Posted By: jfarsetta
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Now, to your interest in the ASHI/NACHI self promoting thing. I say "so what". I want NACHI to be known for having great inspectors. I want folks to know trhat ASHI inspectors arent the only good inspectors.

So how are we supposed to do that? Are we to say something like "ASHI inspectors are good and so are NACHI inspectors"? How about "We're number 3, but we try harder"? Or how about "Pay no attention to organization affilliations, look at the INSPECTOR".

Let's get real. ASHI's been trying to beat NACHI into submission since its inception. From attacks on Nick Gromicko, to our inspectors being sub-standard. ASHI model legislation is geared toward the ASHI inspector, and has a stinking ASHI bias. So, although Igor may differ (nothing against you, my man), I think that NACHI should continue to build our own brand, and should continue to try and convince folks to use NACHI inspectors.

Mentioning NACHI has helped me get some referrals, but was not the only reason. However, it really helped. The better known NACHI becomes, the more respect our member affilliates will command. It's all about the MEMBERS, baby. We are member driven. We help our members, and anyone who needs advice, promote what we are and where we are headed, and MARKET.

That's where it's at for this young organization. Why are you so bothered by it? You seem to be harping about this stuff in your last few posts. What gives?


--
Joe Farsetta

Illigitimi Non Carborundum
"Dont let the bastards grind you down..."

Originally Posted By: rray
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. . .


Originally Posted By: tgardner
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Here’s what’s written in 18 VAC 15-40 : (note this is for a CERTIFIED inspection or for an Inspector holding himself out as “CERTIFIED”. It does not pertain to uncertified inspections or inspectors. NACHI certification is not currently recognized as meeting the minimum requirements for certification in VA - Thank ASHI for that.)


STANDARDS OF CONDUCT AND PRACTICE.
18 VAC 15-40-140. Conflict of interest.
A. The certificate holder shall not:

1. Design or perform repairs or modifications to a residential building on which he has performed a certified home inspection as a result of the findings of the certified home inspection within 12 months after the date he performed the certified home inspection, except in cases where the home inspector purchased the residence after he performed the inspection;

2. Perform a certified home inspection of a residential building upon which he has designed or performed repairs or modifications within the preceding 12 months;

3. Refer his client to another party to make repairs or modifications to a residential building on which he has performed a certified home inspection within the preceding 12 months; or

4. Represent the financial interests, either personally or through his employment, of any of the parties to the transfer or sale of a residential building on which he has performed a certified home inspection.

B. The certificate holder shall not disclose any information concerning the results of the certified home inspection without the approval of the client for whom the certified home inspection was performed. However, the certificate holder may disclose information in situations where there is an imminent endangerment to life and health.
( The standard RE contract in VA addresses this by allowing the seller, buyer, and agents to get a copy)

C. The certificate holder will not accept compensation, financial or otherwise, from more than one interested party for the same service on the same property without the consent of all interested parties.

D. The certificate holder shall not accept nor offer commissions or allowances, directly or indirectly, from other parties dealing with the client in connection with work for which the certificate holder is responsible. Additionally, the certificate holder shall not enter into any financial relationship with any party that may compromise the certificate holder?s commitment to the best interest of his client.

E. The certified home inspection shall not be used as a tool by the certificate holder to solicit or obtain work in another field, except for additional diagnostic inspections or testing.

Tim Gardner


Originally Posted By: jfarsetta
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So, basically, you cant inspect the same house twice…



Joe Farsetta


Illigitimi Non Carborundum
"Dont let the bastards grind you down..."

Originally Posted By: tgardner
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Well - You can re-inspect and charge for it - you just can’t NOT re-inspect, furnish your old inspection to the new client and charge for the same inspection twice or more.


TG


Originally Posted By: Tom Logan
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TG you said it…


A report should not be sold or given to another buyer without written concent from the original owner of the report.

I agree with TG, you can physically re-inspect the same house and furnish a report.

TG


Originally Posted By: Tom Logan
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QUESTION THE WEEK


Is it acceptable for a home inspector to have a second party write the home inspection report for their client?

Example: A HI performs 3 to 4 home inspections a day and does this 6 days a week. Gives his notes to his/her boss, and the boss and/or another staff member writes the report. This was discussed at a conference in California last week.


TG


Originally Posted By: rray
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. . .


Originally Posted By: Tom Logan
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1) Performing 3 to 4 inspections a day can be done. The question you should ask yourself is, Will you spend that extra 1/2 or 2 needed to complete the inspection, or will you go on to your other scheduled inspection? You do not know what you are getting into until you get to the property. If you allow 3 hours for an inspection and travel we can not see how a HI can perform a quality inspection.


2) Writing somebodies report while being entertained is not what we call "Writing a quality report".

TL


Originally Posted By: Tom Logan
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Question Of The Week


Is it true that franchise (Not all) have a tendency to edit the reports in favor of the agent? No HI whats to be labled a "Deal Killer"

I am not picking on franchises for any particular reason. Its only that when a court convicts a HI for fraud, most of the time its a franchise.

TL


Originally Posted By: pdacey
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Quote:
If you allow 3 hours for an inspection and travel we can not see how a HI can perform a quality inspection.

2) Writing somebodies report while being entertained is not what we call "Writing a quality report".


Tom, who are we? And who are you?


--
Slainte!

Patrick Dacey
swi@satx.rr.com
TREC # 6636
www.southwestinspections.com

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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Quote:
You do not know what you are getting into until you get to the property


If you have been an inspector for any length of time in the area you do business in, you had better know what you are getting into.

I have found over the years that it doesn't matter most of the time whether the house is a dump, or a castle. All of the parts of the house have to be checked, and the number of defects don't actually add that much time to the inspection. That is, unless you are the type of inspector who has to describe in minutia every possible cause and remedy for anything you find.

I used to own a franchise. We used a team and it was actually very easy to do 4 high quality inspections in a day. The reports were written (without benefit of margaritas, sorry Russ) completely and accurately by a person I paid to decipher our notes. No report went out without my approval. Each report stated the true condition of the house inspected. Nothing was blown out of proportion, and nothing was "toned down". A house is what it is.

Most of the time, houses kill deals, not the inspector. However, we have a guy around here (Just happens to belong to that other ![icon_evil.gif](upload://1gvq2wV2azLs27xp71nuhZOKiSI.gif) organization) who likes to say things like, Oh, that roof is a real piece of crap. I don't know why they are trying to sell you this house with that roof, its just got to go! That is the type of inspector I find most Realtors consider a deal killer, and I'm glad he's here. It is easy competition.

And Tom, since WE don't know who YOU are, we will just assume that you are one of THEM. When we know how long you've been doing this, where your are, etc. WE will probably be a little more cordial.

Blaine


Originally Posted By: Tom Logan
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RK,


I am not questioning your abilities. I am sure you a an excellent HI and probably would like to have you on our team one day.


TL