Attic access cover

Originally Posted By: mcyr
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Raymond; that was a good article.

Marcel


Originally Posted By: mcyr
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Hey Roy; I thought that was or must of been quite a surprise to open that hatch and this stuff fell on your head. I can just see it now. That is funny.

Who vacuumed the mess? ha. ha.

I bet you, that was the last hatchway you opened.

Question? How would they have blown the insulation over the hatch after they got out? Trivia?

Marcel


Originally Posted By: rcooke
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mcyr wrote:
![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif) ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)

Hey Roy; I thought that was or must of been quite a surprise to open that hatch and this stuff fell on your head. I can just see it now. That is funny.

Who vacuumed the mess? ha. ha.

I bet you, that was the last hatchway you opened.

Question? How would they have blown the insulation over the hatch after they got out? Trivia?

Marcel


Yes my wife the two agents where in hysterics.
They laughed so hard I had to laugh to.
18 inch Gable vent do not know how big the operator was to get through that hole .
I recommended they insulate the hatch door and soft gasket and a barrier before closing it up.
Every one was happy . Another of many stories from the past .


--
Roy Cooke Sr.

http://Royshomeinspection.com

Originally Posted By: mcyr
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Can’t stop laughing, (never thought of the gable vent, that must a been some tight squeeze.) ha. ha.


Marcel


Originally Posted By: rwand1
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They sometimes blow in insulation from the mushroom roof caps. Thus they cover the hatch and the soffit vents. And we all know what happens when soffit vents get covered don’t we?



Raymond Wand


Alton, ON


The value of experience is not in seeing much,


but in seeing wisely. - Sir William Osler 1905


NACHI Member


Registered Home Inspector (OAHI)


http://www.raymondwand.ca

Originally Posted By: dandersen
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One thing that came to mind when reading the judgment was that the home inspector did not specifically report the inability to access the attic and why.


Whenever you come across a barrier which prevents or may restrict the ability to perform an adequate visual inspection, the condition should be noted in the report. Supporting documentation such as photographs will also be a big help.

Some home inspection reports indicating whether the building is occupied or vacant. This indicates to some extent the accessibility of the house for inspection.

Also this judgment indicated that the client was not present at the time of inspection. This is usually elected by the client and may have a bearing as to their ability to understand the complete inspection without visually experiencing it. Most problems with clients after an inspection come from clients that did not attend the inspection. Indicating that the client was present for a follow-up walk-through after inspection may provide substance to any verbal conversation which may have occurred or is the standard which would be normally covered. We are protected under inspection agreement that the written report is the only report, however this is to protect us from being accused by the client of stating something verbally which may be contrary to the written report.

When in doubt, write it down. ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


Originally Posted By: gporter
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A good learning experience.



Gary Porter


GLP’s Home and Mold Inspections LLC


Orlando, Fl 32828


321-239-0621


www.homeandmoldinspections.com

Originally Posted By: rcooke
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dandersen wrote:



Supporting documentation such as photographs will also be a big help.

Some home inspection reports indicating whether the building is occupied or vacant. This indicates to some extent the accessibility of the house for inspection.

Also this judgment indicated that the client was not present at the time of inspection. This is usually elected by the client and may have a bearing as to their ability to understand the complete inspection without visually experiencing it. Most problems with clients after an inspection come from clients that did not attend the inspection. Indicating that the client was present for a follow-up walk-through after inspection may provide substance to any verbal conversation which may have occurred or is the standard which would be normally covered. We are protected under inspection agreement that the written report is the only report, however this is to protect us from being accused by the client of stating something verbally which may be contrary to the written report.

When in doubt, write it down. ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


I agree write it down Miss nothing .

We have to be careful in Canada .

An inspector should get permission before taking pictures.

Some people have complained about this and now many do not want pictures taken in their home.


--
Roy Cooke Sr.

http://Royshomeinspection.com

Originally Posted By: Rafael
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on the comment of the panels …Some panels are screwed in but also caulked or sealed where some damage could occur when removed. are inspectors supposed to break a caulk seal to enter the attic or not?


Originally Posted By: rcooke
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Rafael wrote:
on the comment of the panels .....Some panels are screwed in but also caulked or sealed where some damage could occur when removed. are inspectors supposed to break a caulk seal to enter the attic or not?

If they open easy then I will remove the screws .
If painted shut or caulked then I do not open ,
I write it up Attic not accessible due to painted shut .
I also write At my convince after you move in I will have a look at no charge .
If I am not near then there is a charge .


--
Roy Cooke Sr.

http://Royshomeinspection.com

Originally Posted By: rwand1
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I don’t open sealed (caulk) hatches or screwed shut. That is unless I have permission to open. On the other hand just how many tools am I to carry. I don’t even carry an exacto blade in my inspection kit.


What I would like to know is how very large (rotund) inspectors get into some of these closets I encounter to get into the attic. I bet the large rotund inspectors must do a lot of disclaiming. So it is somewhat a moot point in their case if the attic hatch is sealed or openable. ![icon_redface.gif](upload://f7DX2EWhmUfsDapWaYT3oJHMCj1.gif)


--
Raymond Wand
Alton, ON
The value of experience is not in seeing much,
but in seeing wisely. - Sir William Osler 1905
NACHI Member
Registered Home Inspector (OAHI)
http://www.raymondwand.ca

Originally Posted By: Ian D Norman
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The issue that led to this topic was an argument about whether two screws with signs of prior usage (paint partially scratched off, possibly by a screwdriver, some time after the hatch had its only coat of paint) constituted a substantive barrier to inspection. In this specific case, there was no caulking and the edges of the hatch had not been painted over, so only the screws provided retention. The parties to the argument continue their volleys, day after day, and I continue to watch, spellbound. Nonetheless, I’d like to thank all who contributed to the discussion. As a non-expert, with no prior experience in purchasing property, I have to rely on people such as yourself. The range of opinions appears to be quite narrow: it would seem to hinge (no pun intended) mostly on how securely the access hatch is fastened/sealed. Most of you seem to feel that at least a quick look might be appropriate, provided that the hatch is readily accessible and removable. Some are (quite reasonably, I think) concerned about the personal hazards involved in opening a long-sealed void; a few think that the removal of screws would constitute intrusion. BTW, as a consumer of your services, I most definitely would not buy the argument that the size of the inspector provides an excuse for not checking the void, when the hatch is designed to provide access and the code of practice calls for it.


Originally Posted By: rcooke
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Ian D Norman wrote:

I most definitely would not buy the argument that the size of the inspector provides an excuse for not checking the void, when the hatch is designed to provide access and the code of practice calls for it.


Glad we are able to help and do hope you come back again .
Do not hesitate to ask and we will try and help .
I agree almost with your last sentence, I am not large but have seen some attic entrances that could only be entered by a very small person ( Under 100 lbs) .
Example in the back of a closet that has a permanent shelve mounted and the opening is 10 by 12 inches.
These I write up as not accessible and if the get a larger opening I will ( at my convenience ) examine the attic no charge .
At my Convenience means when I have another inspection in this area.


--
Roy Cooke Sr.

http://Royshomeinspection.com

Originally Posted By: rwand1
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Quote:
I most definitely would not buy the argument that the size of the inspector provides an excuse for not checking the void, when the hatch is designed to provide access and the code of practice calls for it.


You would buy the arguement if you saw some of the inspectors who by size would have a problem. I am 5'9" and have a sleek Panther like body.... even I have problems some days gaining access. ![icon_sad.gif](upload://nMBtKsE7kuDHGvTX96IWpBt1rTb.gif)

Cheers,


--
Raymond Wand
Alton, ON
The value of experience is not in seeing much,
but in seeing wisely. - Sir William Osler 1905
NACHI Member
Registered Home Inspector (OAHI)
http://www.raymondwand.ca

Originally Posted By: phinsperger
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I have gone into an attic access that was 12x16 with room to spare.



.



Paul Hinsperger
Hinsperger Inspection Services
Chairman - NACHI Awards Committee
Place your Award Nominations
here !

Originally Posted By: mcyr
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Ian; Welcome and feel free any time to ask questions and/or comment on this post.

Raymond Wand's post of Oct. 23th explained that you should not have an arsenal of tools to gain access to the attic for inspection. I was about to post this minutes before his post. He beet me to it.

We, as a team, are all here to help and promote discussion on related topics at hand.

NACHI, I believe is non-discrimitory, and by that would have to say, the SOP indicates that one should access the attic through the access panel if accessible. I believe that the normal access way is of 20"x30", but not necessarily true in all occurrences. The old farm house might have an access of 16"x16" or smaller.

I strongly believe that there are good inspectors out there in the U.S., that might not find this access to be adequate and deem the access to be inaccessible. There is nothing wrong with this and could occur anywhere.

A pack of tools should not be necessary to gain access to any component of the dwelling, nor should destructive or force be used for the sake of inspection of the area.
I understand your values and respect that, and wish you to come more often to this board, where you will find many people ready to accommodate and help.

Just my two cents.

Happy Halloween, they are just about to devastate my doorbell in a few minutes, love it.

Good luck.

Marcel


Originally Posted By: rcooke
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I had an inspection hole that was very small I wanted to get a look. I put my arm up with my flash light down the light and then proceed to put my head up I had to wiggle around to get my head up . Could not get up high enough to see any thing. Tried to get my head back down and could not . ( Glad I am not claustrophobic or I could have ripped my ears off.)


I worked and tried every thing Buy this time I was soaking wet.


I finally ripped of a piece of trim to get my head out .


Threw the trim into the attic and wrote up attic not accessible .


Another Chuckle for My buddy Marcel . ( Glad to make his day )


--
Roy Cooke Sr.

http://Royshomeinspection.com

Originally Posted By: mcyr
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



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Hi. Roy;

When I was a kid, I always had cats and did notice when cats wanted to crawl in to tight spaces, their whiskers would tell them if they could go through or not.

I guess in your case, your ears should have given it away. Squeeze your ears and it is a one way street, they won't come back. Almost sounds like a check valve. ha. ha. ha.

Roy; stay away from access panels.

Marcel


Originally Posted By: rwand1
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Post note.


Toronto Star
New Homes Section
Bob Aaron
Sat. Nov. 12/05


http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/B/Bob_Aaron_Toronto_Star.pdf


--
Raymond Wand
Alton, ON
The value of experience is not in seeing much,
but in seeing wisely. - Sir William Osler 1905
NACHI Member
Registered Home Inspector (OAHI)
http://www.raymondwand.ca

Originally Posted By: mcyr
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



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Raymound that was a good article to proof the point.

I agree.

Marcel