Attic ventilation

Originally Posted By: afernbaugh
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I found an attic in a newer home last week that I called out for poor ventilation. What construction/repair trade would be qualified to evaluate attic ventilation? General contractors?



Alan Fernbaugh


Five Star Inspection Services


Baton Rouge, La.

Originally Posted By: gbeaumont
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Hi Alan, yes that is what I would do, in fact I think it generaly rare to call for a PE unless there are potentialy major structural issues. I personally use the phrase “licensed, insured contractor” that way if the client gets Joe Shmo you are in the clear. (appologies to all Joe’s) icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif


Regards


--
Gerry Beaumont
NACHI Education Committee
e-mail : education@nachi.org
NACHI phone 484-429-5466

Inspection Depot Education
gbeaumont@inspectiondepot.com

"Education is a journey, not a destination"

Originally Posted By: afernbaugh
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Gerry,


Thanks, consider it done!

Regards,


--
Alan Fernbaugh
Five Star Inspection Services
Baton Rouge, La.

Originally Posted By: rking
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Alan,


It is also my experience that a good roofer is rather knowledgable of attic venting. After all, in the long run proper ventilation in the attic makes his work last longer and vice versa.


--
Muskoka Home Inspections
"Wisdom is the Anticipation of the Consequences"
Steering Committee Member At Large

Originally Posted By: rray
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What qualifies as poor ventilation? What qualifies as acceptable ventilation?



Home inspections. . . .


One home at a time.


Originally Posted By: rking
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Poor ventilation is when the air cannot move from top to bottom or vice versa.


There is a reason for vented soffits and either vented ridge caps or roof vents of one type or another.


The attic should be as near the outdoor temperature as it can get, even in small spaces between rafters or trusses created by a cathedral ceiling.


It is akin to the requirement (around here anyway) that a house must be able to have three complete air changes per hour by some means whether mechanical or not.


You can gain that air change by leaving a window or two open a hair.


You can also achieve that by running a bathroom and/or kitchen exhaust fan almost constantly.


Or you can go the most economical way and have an HRV system installed. Up here where we get about eight months of heating seasons and two or three months of hot weather and two or three months of something in between the HRV is the best scenario.



Muskoka Home Inspections


“Wisdom is the Anticipation of the Consequences”


Steering Committee Member At Large