Background Experience Necessary?

I was told today by a local property inspector that It is REQUIRED to have a background in construction or engineering in order to do this work. He said that he is a graduate of the ASHI SCHOOL and that their school is “gold standard” and every other school is sub-standard and only give basic info and a “certificate”. I need to know what is actually required as far as previous experience because I only have a nursing background of almost 20 years and ex-military in the telecommunications field. I want to do this training because I am planning my property preservation business and wanted to add another tool to my toolbelt and more value to my business. So, what IS the requirements? How many women are actually doing property preservation nationwide?

There is no requirement for past experience. Construction background is extremely valuable but certainly not necessary. You should do your own research on ASHI. Most of us have and that is why we are here.

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No need to research. I have taken courses at two other schools and got “certified” with a certificate. Just outdated videos and quizzes. No actual instructor or hands on training. So that’s why I am HERE also. Thanks you for the update. :blush:

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What’s required is a good brain on your shoulders. The rest you can learn. NACHI is a great tool to get you started. You will need to rely on external sources to achieve level of “above” the average. People learn different ways, some can only learn from the hands-on experience, some can learn from a book, some from a video, some from combination of these, and so on. Only you know yourself and what you are capable of. You will need to be able to crawl in crawl spaces with spiders, climb roofs, work with crazy customers, sometimes in very filthy conditions. You have to be your own judge, but whomever told you that construction experience is required was just being skeptical of your abilities :slight_smile: Not everyone is cut out to be a great inspector. Some are good at arts, some are good at nursing, some are good with a hammer, and some are good at inspecting. Only you can determine this. Good luck :slight_smile:

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Welcome Alethia, Like Walter and Simon stated, You don’t need any prior construction experience. What you do need is a strong work and study ethic, but I’m guessing based on your prior experience you have that in spades. Get after it if it interests you. There are more and more women each day getting into home inspections. Good Luck!

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Thanks for reaching out! I appreciate it. I hate spiders and though according to the SOP on roof inspections its not REQUIRED to do it but to exceed it to do the job, I WILL.
I was a psychiatric nurse many years and also worked in corrections for a time, so CRAZY and FILTHY are not new to me. Yes, I get that this industry is not soft and sexy like nursing, or massage therapy, which I’m licensed in also, but even there I felt like I was in a WAR ZONE all the time.
This is a 360 degree turn for me. I don’t mind getting dirty and shit , CRAZY seems to be the new normal anyway. I need the autonomy of working alone and I can apply a basic nursing skill set to this
Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan. So far I have taken the Code of Ethics course and the COVID-19 Safe Practices course and now working on the Standards of Procedures course. Then I’ll start on the actual property inspection modules. I usually watch the videos all day long. From 9am to 9pm EVERY DAY. So, I plan on completing this program and finishing.

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Thank you for your military service! I hate spiders too, but i don’t let it stop me. How did you learn to be a nurse? Lots of training and studying? - same thing here, put in the time and you can learn what you need to without having swung a hammer or been in the trades.

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This is just my humble opinion, but the one thing that you need to bring to the table, when you take that first step and all the steps that follow, is professional rigor. An air of professionality. The desire to discover. A compelling need to find everything, and to protect your client. Call it whatever you want. But you need that. Everything else you can learn.

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Thank you for reaching out. I study all day and late into the night. I also joined some property inspector groups on facebook to glean more information about the industry.

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Thanks I appreciate that. :blush:

You can take the exam at any time. When you are done with it NACHI will give you a break down of each subject matter and how you performed in that subject. It really helps when trying to figure out the order of the first years required courses. I did all 12 before opening for business and even went back through a couple just as a refresher. Take a ton of written notes as well. And most importantly, if you don’t understand something, don’t be afraid to ask.
I think that ASHI idiot was just being a peni cranius, and he is full of crap. A background in construction makes some things easier to understand but not necessary at all. I have been in the trades for nearly 30 years now and have actually learned new things thanks to the NACHI school and this forum.
Best of luck to you and THANK YOU for your service!

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So, when describing a defect, we SHOULD use the technical terms?

Thanks for reaching out! That was my plan too. I watch the youtube videos all day. I print out the SOP for the course I’m working on and write my notes on it while watching the video and the online material. :ok_hand:t5:

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But of course Thomas. Looks more professional that way.:smirk:

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:laughing:

A$hi is running scared that they are being over run and that there may not be enough work for them, in the future. IMHO

Hence, the lying.

You can do fine, Alethia!

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Alethia,

I am sure you will make a fine inspector! Welcome!

G

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As mentioned earlier, there are more & more women entering this field and from the sounds of your work /training /experience /dedication to learning, etc, it sounds like you’ll do fine but not to downplay background experience… I too think it’s a huge advantage coming from a background of actually spending time on a construction site and seeing how things come together or how things are installed. It’ll really come in handy not only in better understanding what you’re seeing but also in explaining or defending your report findings.

All the best in your studies and new direction.

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I would say know what you want an inspector to know inspecting a property your purchasing. Don’t chance the money, chase the morals. I know you will hear different but it has work for me for over 7 years. Food for though!!!

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When I was in college back in the 90’s I framed houses to pay my way. I worked with a lady that was a real estate attorney. She wore bags a swung a hammer just like the rest of us. She was there to learn and gain first hand knowledge of construction. I always respected her.

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