Bathroom sink drain to an air gap?

Okay, yesterdays inspection had some unusual situations. Here’s a taste, and looking for opinions…

1958 home w/basement. Basement was partially (3/4) finished. A bathroom sink was installed where the drain piping was run to the floor drain utilizing an air gap principal. It was not plumbed with a trap nor directly to a waste stack.

Although unconventional, and being as the sink only handles grey water, is there actually anything wrong with this setup?

Thanks in advance,
Jeff

I would make sure the buyer knows about it.

Such as:
Water from basement bathroom sink is draining into shower. Caution maybe needed when using shower since soaps and hot water may drain onto shower floor while shower is being used. If correction is wanted, getting an estimate for repairs from a licensed plumber is recommended.

This way you are telling them what is going on, what the consequences can be and what direction to go if they want it done professionally. This way you are covered and the chances of them suing you would be very low in my opinion.

It will be interesting to hear what others have to say.

Thanks for your input. The buyers were with me the whole inspection, and was pointed out, and discussed. I told them I wasn’t ‘positive’ if there was any violation in this set-up, but I would research and include my findings in my report.

If anyone knows of an actual code violation, please reference it, as this is an USDA inspection, and must meet their requirements.
Thanks,
Jeff

Is that an A/C condensate drain on the other side?

Gee ,I hope I get to take a shower in that one.

Correct, Bob.

Notice neither one (piping) passed thru the wall, so the water/moisture runs througn the hole and is wetting the block.

are you sure that it is not just a floor drain goes into the storm drains, and the shower has been added? j

Since that is just CMU it may not matter which side the water is on.:slight_smile:

I did notice the 90 though.

Evidence points to the drain going to sewer. (No odors in shower, except mild mildew stain).

From the layout, except the sink, everything (appears) to be original to the home build. The shower stall (on right of block wall), the toilet (on left of block wall, sink (in question) other side of block wall behind sink is the original location of the laundry (has been relocated to a bedroom upstairs). No piping from under basement slab entering sump pit (only from exterior).

Thanks,
Jeff

Yeah when i look at the picture , But i just want to ask . I seen some strange things done around here lol

Yep, keeps things interesting. There’s plenty more “unique” things in this house. Will post more when I get time.

I had 2 homes with all gray water dumping into the yards Last week, Had one dumping septic water in a lake . And these people believed it was acceptable .

In the Ontario Building Code a lavatory must be directly connected to the plumbing system.

You need to go up to Haliburton or Kinmount , ONT. You find a lot of gray water system dumping into yards .

I did an inspection on a lakefront property last week. Kitchen and bathroom sink drain lines went to the basement laundry tub which drained to the sump pit.

Both kitchen and bathroom drained to the septic tank but Harry Homeowner cut them off so the sinks wouldn’t fill the septic holding tank.

Trying to save money on having the tank pumped?

And they think they have rednecks down here ,lol

lol, I was thinking it.

Its garbage, you can’t plumb that way, inform buyer. Its a serious code violation and trouble for buyer as it will have to be demo’d and re- done.

This a code violation, no air gap should exist between a lavatory and trap arm or stack or bypass stack to drain a sink, every fixture requires its own trap and utilizing the floor drains trap for a secondary drain is illegal, need to re read your basic plumbing & drain waste chapters, basic plumbing 101, recommend not using and call a plumber for estimate so the buyer can counter the proposal with a deduction in selling price for repairs.

Robert if you suggest them counter offering based on findings you are acting as an Agent.