cement

Originally Posted By: jane molina
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Hello everyone


I want to know what is the best way to take a anchor out of a cement slab


Ther are 4 of them they were bolted on to 4 post to hold up a gazeebo.I


took the posts[ 4"] out and all that is left is 4 y shaped braces cemented


into the ground about 5" deep. I just want to take them and cement back


the hole that is left for a smooth surface. can anyone give me any help,


should i use a sledge hammer?


Jane


Originally Posted By: Guest
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Cut the bottom out of a flower pot and slip the pot over the anchor, fill with dirt and reinstall flower assembly.


Or, buy a long sawzall blade, it'll flex to flush cut.


Originally Posted By: tallen
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Grind them down flush with the concrete and fill it up.



I have put the past behind me,


where , however, it now sits, making rude remarks.


www.whiteglovehomeinspections.net

30 Oct 2003-- 29 Nov2005

Originally Posted By: kdemski
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torch 'em


Originally Posted By: jbehling
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Cut them off flush with a reciprocating saw, short of that you will have to jack hammer around them to get them completely out icon_wink.gif


Originally Posted By: dfrend
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Tape a stick o’ dynomite and run like hell!



Daniel R Frend


www.nachifoundation.org


The Home Inspector Store


www.homeinspectorstore.com

Originally Posted By: jane molina
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Thanks everyone


Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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FYI…it’s concrete, not cement…cement is just one of 5 components of concrete… icon_wink.gif



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Originally Posted By: Guest
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Sand, aggregate, cement. I suppose you could include water but it’s not really a component for very long. What’s the fifth one ? Sweat?


Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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Cement


Water


Fine aggregate


Course aggregate


Air


As long as there is water present the concrete will continue to cure.
Concrete contains air from 2% naturally to as much as 8% if it's chemically added. Air provides strength to concrete.


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Originally Posted By: Guest
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Kevin,


Air entrained concrete isn't necessarily stronger than concrete that's been vibrated to within an inch of its life. Air entrained does have better freeze thaw resistance and better resistance to spalling, but compressive strengths for similar mixes aren't quite as high. If you're counting air in regular concrete, then I'm counting it as a component in the ice cube in my drink .


Originally Posted By: mbartels
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Smart asses icon_razz.gif


Originally Posted By: slanicek
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while a lot of the above are great tips, before i bust out anything electric…or even a torch…try to pound the thing in with a hammer. 99% of slabs that were only used for the purpose of a patio, etc. are probably only 4 inches deep to begin with. tap on the bolt and it will more than likely start going down as it will penetrate the bottom of the slab and just keep going down into the ground. plus, there won’t be anything that will need patching if you do it properly. just leave the head of the bolt flush with the slab.