Client questionnaire templates

i am looking for some templates for the office to use when they get a call, would like several and compile info from all.
thanks,
JT

Hi James, welcome.

Where is the home located?
What year built?
Type of foundation?
Vacant or occupied?
Detached structures?
Interested in add on services such as XXXX?

Done.

Now, there will be coordination steps…follow-up emails etc.

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Im in Arkansas

Great !

But my list of questions is for the call screeners.

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To Brian‘s question I would add square footage. A 4000 square-foot home will take you longer to inspect than a 1500 square-foot home.

Once you have them on the phone it’s time to sell sell sell.

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Yes! I should not have missed that. It may be the most important!

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right so you don’t get into the sq ft of the home, 1 or 2 story I realize you get a lot of people tying up your time and you will never get there business. I just want the office to have a good template to ask everyone ever time a call come in since we are a new business, I want it to be consistent every time. lol guess that’s the Police Chief coming out in me. most always ask what do you charge, and trying to decide to charge a flat fee or do it by sq. ft.

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Age, location, foundation, square footage are all critical factors.

I would start with a minimum fee which will vary based on location. (Example, mine is $395 base price. I won’t start my truck for less)

Then you can work out a fee schedule.

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Any related living areas?
Are there any multiple systems? HVAC, water heater etc.
Are all areas accesible?

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I like your first question. Especially finished basements etc. I don’t worry about the rest.

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I don’t always ask, but it is nice to know if the home is occupied. Gives you a heads-up on what to expect when you get there.

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Also when you give them an estimate let them know the price is just that it’s an estimate. Often clients don’t know the exact year or square footage their home was built. I always check the tax assessors website and find that more often than not the square footage is a little bit larger and the home is a little bit older. All of this affects the price.

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How many buyers actually know this?

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Sometimes they don’t. But I keep it simple, basement, crawl or slab.

If they don’t know and I can’t get to online information to verify at the moment, I just tell them what the add on cost would be for the crawl or basement then cross that bridge when needed.

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I don’t have any template per say, but my usual conversation with a client begins with:

What is the property address and are you working with an agent? (I have access to MLS etc. and can do a quick research on the property.)

If not listed in the MLS, Realtor.com or similar may give you basics, especially if a FSBO.

If no information online, I will ask for the seller’s contact information and contact regarding a request for their home to be inspected.

The point being is I don’t give a fee quote to a potential client based solely on info they give me. I prefer to ‘look’ into the property further before throwing out a number.

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Nice Junior! Does that provide a fee quote also?

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Not automatically, it goes directly to us, so we can look it up and send them a quote. We get notified right away.

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I usually ask for the address first, then square footage, and get the deer in the headlights feel over the phone at the square footage. So I just look up the address online to get the info I need.

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So for the OP, there is an automated template that can be used for basic info. Enough to get started with. :+1:

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