CO Levels

Originally Posted By: cbottger
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



9 PPM


The maximum allowable concentration for short term exposure in a living area according to ASHRAE.


35 PPM
The maximum allowable concentration for continuous exposure in any eight hour period industry according to MIOSHA

200 PPM
Maximum concentration allowable in any 15 minute period according to OSHA slight headaches, fatigue,dizziness, nausea after 2 to 3 hours

400 PPM
Frontal headaches within 1 to 2 hours, life threatening after 3 hours. Maximum allowable limit in flue gas according to EPA and AGA

800 PPM
Dizziness, nausea and convulsions within 45 minutes. Unconsciousness within 2 hours. Death within 2 to 3 hours

1600 PPM
Headaches, dizziness and nausea within 20 minutes. Death within 1 hour

3200 PPM
Headaches dizziness and nausea within 5 to 10 minutes. Death within 30 minutes.

6400 PPM
Headaches,dizziness and nausea within 1 to 3 minutes. Death within 10 to 15 minutes.

12,800 PPM
Death within 1 to 3 minutes

I am a believer that all HI's should be performing CO tests and would like to see it adopted as a standard of practice. The price of a CO meter is no more than the price of just one Inspection.


--
Don't argue with an idiot someone watching may not be able to tell the difference.

Originally Posted By: Scott Patterson
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



I have a problem with the testing of CO. I agree 101% that it is a killer, but the knowledge and theory involved to properly diagnose a CO problem is way outside the realm of training for the majority of home inspectors. I have seen way too many home inspectors screwup by providing false or misleading CO information simply because they took their detector out of the box and started using it with no formal training or experience.


I have a Monoxor II and I seldom use it; if I do use it I will not report that I used it and I will not let my customer see me using it. CO is a funny gas that can and does float around like an invisible cloud, depending on what is producing it and how it is being produced you could have a positive reading one day and nothing the next day. I use my CO detector only to help me if I have a question and as another tool like my screwdriver.

If you are bent on testing for CO please invest in some training. Bacharach offers one of the best training schools in the country for CO. http://www.bacharach-inc.com/training.htm


Originally Posted By: cbottger
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Scott:


you are probally right alot of Hi’s should not check CO but if it was made a standard of practice training would have to be obtained. As for myself have been in the HVAC for the past 40 years and am very comfortable with a CO meter. Any time I suspect that the heat exchanger is cracked based on a CO check I recommend that a second test be performed by the local gas company as they will perform a CO test for free in my area. My client feels safe the realtors are not mad and I am protected.



Don’t argue with an idiot someone watching may not be able to tell the difference.

Originally Posted By: jhagarty
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



When offering a service such as CO testing, it is important to maintain a calibration schedule on the equipment. This Calibration can be performed within the office or the equipment may sent to Bacharach on a routine basis to maintain the Calibration log.


http://www.bacharach-training.com/Calibration/monoxor/monoxor.htm


--
Joseph Hagarty

HouseMaster / Main Line, PA
joseph.hagarty@housemaster.com
www.householdinspector.com

Phone: 610-399-9864
Fax : 610-399-9865

HouseMaster. Home inspections. Done right.

Originally Posted By: dfrend
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Quote:
the knowledge and theory involved to properly diagnose a CO problem is way outside the realm of training for the majority of home inspectors


Scott, how about if the inspectors are not trying to diagnose the problem, just the existance of one. Frankly the actual problem diagnosis is better left to a licensed professional. Just like you probably would not diagnose any problem with any system. Maybe a better practice for HI'st than to "diagnose" would be to "identify".

Just my opinion


--
Daniel R Frend
www.nachifoundation.org
The Home Inspector Store
www.homeinspectorstore.com