Common Mistakes made by new inspectors

Originally Posted By: gjohnson
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I am looking for some examples of mistakes that are commonly made by new inspectors to the industry.



Gary (Snicker’s) Johnson - Free NACHOS


The NACHI Foundation


Executive Director


301-591-9895

Originally Posted By: kpapp
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Well Gary, I am new to the industry and I would have to say that the biggest mistake that I made was thinking that this would be an easy profession. Boy was I wrong…I will say it is a learning experience everyday of the week for me and I enjoy the challenge…



_______________________________________


If you dont have time to do it right the first time, When will you have the time to go back and fix it?

Originally Posted By: gjohnson
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I agree Ken…



oh yeah i forgot to say, biggest mistakes.

one of them being not joining NACHI

I know someone will chime that one in somewhere,.


--
Gary (Snicker's) Johnson - Free NACHOS
The NACHI Foundation
Executive Director

301-591-9895

Originally Posted By: rwills
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Gary, I think one mistake would be: Trying to answer or (BS), there way through a question posed by a client! It’s perfectly fine to say “Honestly, I don’t know, but I’ll look into that for you”!



Bob Wills - MAB Chairman


BW Inspection Services


Warminster, Pa.


http://www.bwinspections.com

Originally Posted By: jkiesecker
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Gary, Remember who you work for. Your first obligation is to your customer. Be fair, impartial and honest. Avoid words or phrases like “holy crap” or “this is shot” icon_rolleyes.gif . Remember your customer wants to buy this house. Try to help them by prioritizing needed repairs for them. Avoid discussing anything with the seller. Use these message boards, valuable free information


Originally Posted By: gjohnson
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J Kiesecker,


That is great advice... I use the boards everyday.. I am collecting this information for a paper that I am writing...


--
Gary (Snicker's) Johnson - Free NACHOS
The NACHI Foundation
Executive Director

301-591-9895

Originally Posted By: glittle1
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Gary, Communication and setting the bar of expectation on what a visual inspection means , will become a valuable daily asset to your visual home inspections icon_wink.gif


Originally Posted By: tgardner
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One can use “Holy Crap” if one is just recovering from a STAB-LOK panel removing shock. That was what was in MY pants! icon_eek.gif icon_eek.gif icon_eek.gif


tg


Originally Posted By: lwilliams
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I think one of the biggest mistakes new inspectors make is reporting out of proportion. I am speaking from experience. The actual inspection is the easy part, how you report what you see is the hard part. The words you use, body language, tone of voice all portray your thoughts and can be interpreted in ways not intended! The faster you learn to report things in perspective the sooner you becoming a reputable inspector.


Originally Posted By: dfrend
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rwills wrote:
Gary, I think one mistake would be: Trying to answer or (BS), there way through a question posed by a client! It's perfectly fine to say "Honestly, I don't know, but I'll look into that for you"!


Funny, all this week in Fire Instructor class, the instructor has stressed that. Just like students, if you lie to the customers, they will lose all respect for you.


--
Daniel R Frend
www.nachifoundation.org
The Home Inspector Store
www.homeinspectorstore.com

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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I think the biggest mistake many new inspectors make is not deciphering the information they are seeing, since many times they are seeing a defect or possible defect for the first time. We have seen many questions from newbies on this board who thought something was terribly wrong only to find out it was correct. A dishwasher air gap from another thread comes to mind immediately. To many newbies, everything looks wrong and they lack the practical experience from which to distinguish proper installations (look at the electrical thread 12 gauge wire to 30 amp breaker) from improper ones.


But then, we all had to start somewhere.....


Originally Posted By: dbowers
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A very common problem I see new guys make is saying:


(1) its wrong but I don't report it because I don't think its a big deal.
(2) its wrong but thats how our contractors always do it so I don't report it. If I did report it the realtors will get mad and won't use me again.
(3) its wrong but the code guy approved it like it is.

You don't have to make a big deal out of something, but if its wrong report it or before long you'll have your CLIENT calling and wanting you to pay to fix things because they're wrong.

Dan Bowers