Cracks Expert Needed!

I’m not an engineer and the photos are lacking but I would tend to go with the engineer on site because he sees the whole picture.

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The OP “is” the Engineer :rofl:

Images of the pool, how far the pool is from the foundation please and any points of excavation.

Are you sure the envelope is not EFIS or DRYVIT? There is an horizontal expansion joint above the bump-out. With Structural Masonry this would not be the case.
Any Infrared images?

There cracks do not look serious what so ever. For 1, they are uniform, uniform vertical or uniform horizontal cracks inline with abutting systems or components.
1: The first image might be a hairline crack at a bond-beam spanning the opening below for a fenestration/window frame below…
2: The crack in the second image is likely the HVAC duct work. I suspect the larger rectangular shape crack is from the sheet metal ductwork termination the register exhaust or intake grill is attached to.
3: The last image horizontal crack is inline with the fenestration/metal window frame.
Just me 2 cents.

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A home inspector following the standards of practice would recognize this issue outside the scope of a profession which relies on non-destructive visual observation, and move on. The practice of law and engineering should be left to licensed professionals.

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Thanks Robert. I agree and have the same opinion. The rectangular one is for sure related to the duct work connected to the fresh air register.
The horizontal one under the glass panel is a separation between the rubber caulking material holding the glass panel and the masonry floor. Rest are hairline shrinkage cracks.
As much as I can predict based on images and not physically inspecting
Thanks for the feedback

Yes, I mistook the local inspector for another engineer. None the less there isn’t enough info to diagnose from afar and a local engineer needs to assess it, IMHO.

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Impossible to make any educated constructive comments without being on site and description provided. Lacks good pictures for one thing.
Sorry.

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Looking closer, it appears the register terminates in panel substrate used for EIFS or DRYVIT that was not properly sealed.
The horizontal line a control joint.
A thermogram would tell you more about the envelope.
Cracks

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Great insight. Thanks, Robert for the detailed assessment

If the OP can’t satisfy basic questions from Simon and Marc I don’t see it as a thread worth replying to.

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Based on the size, depth and distance from the building I seriously doubt the excavation had any influence on the structure. The photos look like synthetic stucco most likely on a wood framed building or light gauge steel framing. A full concrete structure is typically reserved for large multi-story buildings, which haven’t been built in decades due to cost and weight. Have your client hire a local engineer for $500 for an initial assessment.

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Thanks, Randy
The concrete block walls is used and is very common where this customer is located (South Africa). They sent me more photos today that are clearer and shows a clear settlement of the patio door (large sliding aluminum panels), where the aluminum frame separated from the concrete header.
I actually proposed that a structural engineer should “physically” inspect as it will not be an accurate assessment if remotely done.
Thanks

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Good advice, Ehab! :smile:

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Just my two cents. I would ask your friends to inspect the windows, interior and exterior doors to see if they are operating well. Also have them check the finishes on the interior of the back wall and their adjacent walls for signs of cracking or separating. This information might give you clearer insight.
Still, having a local structural engineer take a look now and follow up in 6 months would be a wonderful idea.

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Thanks, John.
I propose the checking of the doors for all rooms and they confirmed all are closing and opening smoothly, which tells me that there probably no structural settlement

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Strange you say that Kenton.
That’s why I didn’t comment on this thread.

Is there anyone in here from STL?

What’s an STL and why does it matter??

They need chimney help. But, I am not sure they know how to go about hiring and inspector.

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