digital cameras

Originally Posted By: rsummers
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I want to add pictures to my reports.Whats the best camera for the job with out spending a ton of money on something I’m going to end up breaking.


Originally Posted By: psabados
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Rolland


That question is like asking what's the best software or vehicle to drive, very loaded. eusa_eh.gif I recommend for everyday shooting something at about 2-3 megapixels, zoom ability and different shooting modes.

I started out with a Sampo 800 back in 98. 2x digital zoom only, three size formats and a few other bells and whistles, 300.00 back then.

Now I use a Canon S-10 or A-60. Got the A-60 on Ebay for 150.00 new never used. Added a charger, super 2000mAb batts, 256K card, for another 60.00. The A-60 is better and has the ability to use different lens such as .50 wide angle and other zooms.

What every you buy, make sure you have a good supply of high quality batteries. Get a case that has an easy to use flap or cover with velcro fasteners. Keep the protective cover on the LCD also.

Paul


Originally Posted By: rsummers
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Thanks for the advice Paul. icon_smile.gif


Originally Posted By: jdavidson
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The most important thing is the high quality batteries! They are all readdy good now. Mine Eats batteries!


Originally Posted By: jhorton
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Others will most likely disagree but that’s nothing new. But all you need for a printed report, assuming you are going to do like me and print on plain paper, is a 640x 480 resolution. Most likely you will end up reducing them even smaller. Most any digital will take much higher resolution photos than that.



Jeff <*\><


The man who tells the truth doesn’t have to remember what he said.

Originally Posted By: psabados
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That’s true Jeff.


And from an initial cost basis there are some really basic digital camera's available for around $50.00. No zoom or settings, but it does do the job and it allows one time to figure out if photo's are for them or not.

Paul


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Paul,


That is a great idea. However, be warned that a bad picture is worse than no picture at all. It takes some time to get used to relaying what your pictures are showing to the client and others. It does not necessarily come over night, so of us had to work on it for a while.

Just a few pointers if you plan on adding pictures to your report. The first would be that most tend to crawl up on the subject and snap. If you get too close, people will be lost, not knowing where you found this, sometimes even what it is. Make sure you get a good field of view, with other objects in the picture to "SHOW" the way to the subject.

Sometimes pictures have a tendency to lessen the urgency because it does not look that bad in the photo. Make sure you word it with some urgency when you come across things that are a safety issue. For instance, when I take a picture of GFCI receptacles that should be at the kitchen counters and bathroom, the picture can downplay the importance of the GFCI protection because all people are seeing is the receptacle. I always add the words "SAFETY HAZARD!" when they are missing so people don't think I was just taking pictures of any old receptacles.

You can always pick up a few photographic magazines, they always contain little tips and tricks which will help you take better pictures. Just think before you snap. icon_biggrin.gif

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: tgardner
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I use a Canon S110 because it’s small, takes great pics, and uses the same CF card that my PDA uses. To get relevance on close ups, I use a 6" machinist’s scale in the photo for reference. A word text box with arrows pointing to the object of my discovery points out the less than obvious.


tg