Direct tap

Originally Posted By: jane molina
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What is direct tap mean?


Originally Posted By: Bob Badger
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Direct tap is not a NEC term so there is no correct answer, it could change from area to area.


That said I would expect it to mean a feeder or service tap.

Both feeder and service taps are situations where you connect a tap conductor of lower ampacity to a service or feeder of higher capacity.

Say I need to feed an additional load of 30 amps in an area that had a 100 amp feeder.

I could connect 30 amp rated wire to the 100 amp feeder only to go a short distance (3', 10' or 25' depending on conditions) to a 30 amp over current device.

The 30 amp conductors between the 100 amp feeder and the 30 amp over current device are the tap conductors. The wires past the 30 amp over current device are feeders.


--
Bob (AKA iwire)
ECN Discussion Forums
Mike Holt Code Forum

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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http://www.wago.com/wagoweb/italy/ita/news/wd_online/wdint_1_2002/i02_direct_reliable.htm




This is the closest that I came to the term:

"Reliable and simple tap directly onto the power supply"

I will check while on vacation next week in Spain, Monaco, France, and Italy because this product was advertised on a foreign site.


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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Ilsco makes a nice little Insulation Displacement Tap. You just clamp it over the wire and tighten the bolt. It is totally insulated once you get the thing tightened up. It makes a feeder tap a quick matter.


http://ebusiness.ilsco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?storeId=10001&langId=-1&catalogId=1&categoryId=3


Originally Posted By: jpope
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A “direct tap” as would be defined by an HI (or at least by me icon_biggrin.gif ) is any connection where over-current protection has been bypassed.


Typically, in my experience, a direct tap will be found in the service panel.

I use this terminology in my reporting.


--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Jeff:


The terms "Bypassed" or "Jumper" that eliminated the correct overcurrent protection would be something that could be used too.

![icon_biggrin.gif](upload://iKNGSw3qcRIEmXySa8gItY6Gczg.gif)


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: jpope
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jtedesco wrote:
The terms "Bypassed" or "Jumper" that eliminated the correct overcurrent protection would be something that could be used too.


True dat! Creature of habit. That was the way I was taught ![icon_biggrin.gif](upload://iKNGSw3qcRIEmXySa8gItY6Gczg.gif)


--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: dbozek
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Ahh the ole kupl tap…use them quite often especially when making a hot splice. That would or could be called a direct tap as well. As Bob mentioned…me thinks the same way.



You cannot help men permanently by doing for them what they should and could do for themselves. Abraham Lincoln

Originally Posted By: dbowers
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" (house out in the boonies with no code inspections when built - for the city slickers in the crowd, that helps keep the housing more AFFORDABLE - till it burns). The main entry lines ran from the pole by the road, to the house - then down the wall to the meter. Right before the entry wires entered the meter - another set of wires was “tapped” (jumpered, connected, or whatever) onto the main lines. They ran the length of the wall, turned a corner and ran to the A/C unit. There was no disconnect outside the A/C unit - I pulled the case - the wires went to the contactor. IMHO that would be called in my report a - DIRECT TAP.


By the way I called that wiring arrangements several other things also.

Dan Bowers, CRI


Originally Posted By: jpope
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Oh, you mean something like this?


![icon_biggrin.gif](upload://iKNGSw3qcRIEmXySa8gItY6Gczg.gif)




--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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Dan that is what I call a service tap. You have tapped service conductors. There is nothing wrong with that if you follow the “service conductor” rules, mostly isolation and protection, and it terminates in service rated equipment.


You really should not be piping service conductors around the house but if he put a service rated disconnect next to the meter pan it is probably OK. Then it is just a feeder.