Dirt Floor basement question.

Originally Posted By: rharrington
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I’m scheduled to do an inspection on a older home with a dirt floor cellar. Looking for advice on this before the inspection so that I don’t miss any thing. My thought is that the foundation inspection is a normal inspection. This obviously is a very old house.


Thanks,

Rick


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Rick A. Harrington
Central Ohio Home Inspections
www.patchhomeinspections.com

Originally Posted By: dbowers
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Bring your dirt filter so you can make a full determination about whether the dirt is the right texture and consistency and has good coloring.


Originally Posted By: jkormos
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icon_confused.gif WHAT THE icon_confused.gif


Originally Posted By: bking
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those older homes have some real problems with the floor struture that can vary from just being built wrong, damage during “upgrades”, rot, sinking or leaning pillars, water intrusion and the list goes on.



www.BAKingHomeInspections.com

Originally Posted By: roconnor
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Dirt floor cellars and crawl spaces are much more likely to have moisture and pest damage. Check the sill plates carefully. Also, for walls more than about 4 feet high, check that the bottom of the wall is not moving inward.


(P.S. Joe ... Dan is kidding ... ![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif) )


--
Robert O'Connor, PE
Eagle Engineering ?
Eagle Eye Inspections ?
NACHI Education Committee

I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong

Originally Posted By: aslimack
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Look for signs of powder post beetle damage. Most often, i see it on the lower side of the main beams. If you’re not familiar, you look for what appears to be holes the approximate size a bic pen would leave if you poked it into the wood.


I would not be bashful about poking around the structure with a screwdriver. (or whatever) Rotted sill plates, unusual settling, inadequate columns, wood to soil floor contact, deteriorating of the columns at the base, lack of a poly vapor barrier, asbestos (possible) on the heating ductwork or pipes....

Adam, A Plus


Originally Posted By: rharrington
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Thanks for all your help. The inspection is this Saturday.


Rick


--
Rick A. Harrington
Central Ohio Home Inspections
www.patchhomeinspections.com

Originally Posted By: mcyr
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How did your inspection go.?icon_smile.gif


Marcel


Originally Posted By: rharrington
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Marcel,


You actually saw the pictures on another post. Where I suggested calling in the structural engineer. I spent a lot of time in that basement and crawl spaces. Lots of issues. I feel I did a pretty thorough job.

I recommended the engineer as you know due to handyman work and pest inspection just to protect herself because of the age of the structure and hidden rim joist (covered, not replaced, with a new rim joist) that may have hidden more rot or infestation.


--
Rick A. Harrington
Central Ohio Home Inspections
www.patchhomeinspections.com