Do you call out Negative slope of the tub ledge?

Get rid of that level immediatly.

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Haha! Defect every 6 to 12 inches throughout the building!

My concern would be whether or not that window is tempered.

Well, don’t stop there, measure COF while at it, the tile may not be ADA compliant :slight_smile: those tile angles are pretty sharp looking, could be pretty bad slip.

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I would definitely write up that toilet paper holder for being mounted the wrong direction, too low to the floor, and too far back to the wall. It should load from the front, be 30" off the floor and 12" in front of the toilet rim. You are just asking for a back injury being forced to twist around and maneuver in that tight space. Furthermore, clearances around the toilet are too tight on the sides and from toilet rim to door frame. A full bathroom renovation is required.

I would put this in my report:
“Safety Hazard - Installation of the toilet paper holder is dangerous and clearances around the toilet are not adequate or safe. This should be repaired by a licensed plumbing contractor to NKBA and local standards before using this bathroom. I recommend getting 3 quotes for demolition and renovation prior to the expiration of your objection period. Don’t go with the lowest price. Get the guy who is #1 in the #2 business.”

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I’d move it for $500 plus mileage. The big question is can you find toilet paper to put on the holder?

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I’m so embarrassed now … In 35 yrs of inspecting I’ve never reported this. My own is that way. Where would it go IF it was sloped to the tub lip ??? Not a concern to me BUT seems I’m probably a soft HI.

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Good catch, Martin. TP is the FREON of personal hygiene. Worked great, but can’t get it anymore.

“Although the TP dispenser may be common in houses of this age, this is now considered older technology and refills may no longer be available. I recommend upgrading to modern standards.”

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Its quite amusing reading the posts from inspectors that do not disclose what is possibly attributing to ceiling drywall damage below a bathroom.

It is quite amusing reading the posts from inspectors that do not disclose how bath tub caulking deficiencies possibly attribute to ceiling drywall and other possible damages.

It is quite amusing reading the posts from inspectors that do not disclose if a bath tub was installed correctly.

To think a simple level would help disclose this. Hmm. Interesting.

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Here is a case where tub tile surround gradient was reversed and caulking not effectively sealed to all surfaces. The tiles were negatively sloped to the wall/tub intersection and pooled at the curb. The possibility for bulk water penetration was high.
Recomendtionation: Recaulk all surfaces that abut the tub.

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You would measure from the finished flooring to the top of the inner window sill.
If/When under 24" Safety Glass and EERO is required.

Not sure where you are coming up with 24" for a window in a tub enclosure.

Wet Areas

The higher risk of slips and falls in wet areas means most glass located in bathrooms or near a hot tub or sauna must be constructed from safety glass. All glass in the bathroom or around a hot tub or sauna must consist of safety glass if the bottom edge is less than 60 inches above a standing or walking surface, such as the shower floor. In outdoor areas around a hot tub, all glazing must be constructed from safety glass if the bottom of the glass is less than 60 inches above the walkway and also within 60 inches of the edge of the water, according to the IRC.

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He’s mixed up as usual.

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I was not referring to hot tubs or saunas.

The tub the OP posted looks like a universal tub model. Not a left hand or right side entrance tub.
The window sill looks more than 24" inches height.
R308.4 Hazardous locations. Link from [Gerry Beaumont]
B] R308.4 Hazardous locations.
The following shall be considered specific hazardous locations for the purposes of glazing:

  1. Glazing in swinging doors except jalousies.
  2. Glazing in fixed and sliding panels of sliding door assemblies and panels in sliding and bifold closet door assemblies.
  3. Glazing in storm doors.
  4. Glazing in all unframed swinging doors.
  5. Glazing in doors and enclosures for hot tubs, whirlpools, saunas, steam rooms, bathtubs and showers. Glazing in any part of a building wall enclosing these compartments where the bottom exposed edge of the glazing is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) measured vertically above any standing or walking surface.
  6. Glazing, in an individual fixed or operable panel adjacent to a door where the nearest vertical edge is within a 24-inch (610 mm) arc of the door in a closed position and whose bottom edge is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) above the floor or walking surface.
  7. Glazing in an individual fixed or operable panel, other than those locations described in Items 5 and 6 above, that meets all of the following conditions:
    7.1. Exposed area of an individual pane greater than 9 square feet (0.836 m2).
    7.2. Bottom edge less than 18 inches (457 mm) above the floor.
    7.3. Top edge greater than 36 inches (914 mm) above the floor.
    7.4. One or more walking surfaces within 36 inches (914 mm) horizontally of the glazing.
  8. All glazing in railings regardless of an area or height above a walking surface. Included are structural baluster panels and nonstructural infill panels.
  9. Glazing in walls and fences enclosing indoor and outdoor swimming pools, hot tubs and spas where the bottom edge of the glazing is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) above a walking surface and within 60 inches (1524 mm) horizontally of the water’s edge. This shall apply to single glazing and all panes in multiple glazing.
  10. Glazing adjacent to stairways, landings and ramps within 36 inches (914 mm) horizontally of a walking surface when the exposed surface of the glass is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) above the plane of the adjacent walking surface.
  11. Glazing adjacent to stairways within 60 inches (1524 mm) horizontally of the bottom tread of a stairway in any direction when the exposed surface of the glass is less than 60 inches (1524 mm) above the nose of the tread.