Electrical or Plumbing, You make the call.

Originally Posted By: bbadger
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I was working with some pictures and thought some here might want to see this.


![](upload://kAjtcImMor67UG5cnpCsTfdQxsh.jpeg)


Elecrical?

Plumbing?

Heavy duty draft beer lines?


--
Bob Badger
Electrical Construction & Maintenance
Moderator at ECN

Originally Posted By: rcooke
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It is pyrotenax . Many are single conductors that is the reason for the brass plate . Single conductors can cause eddie curents and heat in steel. It is almost inpossible to destroy it and it can stand a fire for a considerable time .


You can hit it with a hammer many times make it flat and it still preforms great . I have put in many miles .


http://www.sesco-ge.com/pd_pyrotenax.htm


Roy Cooke sr Brighton Ont royshomeinspection.com


Originally Posted By: escanlan
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Hi Bob,


Thanks for the photo, you just cost me an hours time out of my schedule!! ![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif) ![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif) Just went and did a little research on it as I have never seen this before in many years of military and commercial work. From the looks of the surroundings it appears this was a commercial installation? What was this particular installation? This is some interesting cable. I see it is used in critical, life services sustaining applications.

Hey Roy,

So you were not always an HI?? Where did you string your many miles? Did you do a lot of tunnels, buildings, elevators???

Manny (Emmanuel) Scanlan


Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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AKA MI cable. Where did you see that Bob?


Originally Posted By: rcooke
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



escanlan wrote:
Hi Bob,

Thanks for the photo, you just cost me an hours time out of my schedule!! ![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif) ![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif) Just went and did a little research on it as I have never seen this before in many years of military and commercial work. From the looks of the surroundings it appears this was a commercial installation? What was this particular installation? This is some interesting cable. I see it is used in critical, life services sustaining applications.

Hey Roy,

So you were not always an HI?? Where did you string your many miles? Did you do a lot of tunnels, buildings, elevators???

Manny (Emmanuel) Scanlan

1951 Orenda where they built jet engines 1957 hydro generating plants .
1962 pilkington Glass where they made plate glass . Many areas had high heat and this was the only wire that would stand the heat. Have used it in other places also It is good for heat tracing also as weather also does not effect it completely water proof also . Because it was single conductor in the larger sizes it could be a little hard to bend 3/0 solid with the jacket on it helped to develop strong wrists. Yes I was a Sparky before also my son is and my two brothers where also.
Roy Cooke sr.


Originally Posted By: escanlan
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Hey Roy, Bob, others,


Can't really envision a worthwhile residential application for this type of cabling. Has anyone ever seen it used in a residence? What for?

Roy,

Sounds like you had a nice bit of variety in your life. Sounds like you are pasing it on to your children. Don't ask why, reading many of your previous posts I always thought you were a much younger, but still very intelligent person. Must be the Canadian lifestyle, Eh?

Manny (Emmanuel) Scanlan


Originally Posted By: rcooke
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



escanlan wrote:
Hey Roy, Bob, others,

Can't really envision a worthwhile residential application for this type of cabling. Has anyone ever seen it used in a residence? What for?

Roy,

Sounds like you had a nice bit of variety in your life. Sounds like you are passing it on to your children. Don't ask why, reading many of your previous posts I always thought you were a much younger, but still very intelligent person. Must be the Canadian lifestyle, Eh?

Manny (Emmanuel) Scanlan


Yes I did see it on a home as the incoming feed . It looked like 3/4 inch copper feed. I have a picture and will try and find it tomorrow and post it . 1960 service and it looked like it had just been put in last week .
My son is also a home inspector NACHI member . That is why I always sign Sr he has the same name as me . We also have similar License plate I have I INSPK He has I INSPT. We did a mansion together and the agent came in and said you guys have the same plates on your vehicles . I said well we are both Roy D. Cooke and we are both electricians and should we both not have the same plates (OH YES I guess so he said)
We had to go into the other room to laugh.
Roy C Sr


Originally Posted By: escanlan
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/P/Pyrotenax_005.jpg ]


[ Image: http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/P/Pyrotenax_009.jpg ]


This is from the email:

Quote:
For those that have never seen pyrotenax. I did an old home and the service stack looked like a piece of 3/4 copper. This is mineral insulated cable that requires a special gland installed with special tools . It is almost indistructable . It will stand a fire or you can mash it with a hammer . Very seldome used as a feed in a home . The neutral insulation at the top looks a little deteriated . Inside the panel looked like new . I expect it could be 40 years old . I have not used any for at least 40 years . It is used a lot in hydro generating stations .

http://www.tycothermal.com/europe/english/wiring/literature/PyrotenaxCables_IR241.pdf

I believe it was number 6 wire hard to tell as pyro is solid wire . It was a fused disconnect with 90 amp fuses.
Many concerns in this home from zonite to 9 inch tiles steel and plastic water lines knob and tube . Remember write hard talk soft.
Roy Cooke sr Brighton ont .


Very, very interesting subject!

Thank you Roy Sr.


--
Manny (Emmanuel) Scanlan

Knowledge is power, but sharing knowledge brings peace!

Originally Posted By: rcooke
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Pyro pictures


Emmanuel Scanlan


Looks Great thanks for posting it . Wonderfull for all to use and learn . Roy C sr


Originally Posted By: bbadger
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



First, Thanks Roy C I had never even imagined that this would be used in a residence.


I am used to calling this product "MI" which for the users of the NEC means Mineral-Insulated, Metal-Sheathed Cable.

"Type MI mineral-insulated, metal-sheathed cable consists of one or more solid copper conductors insulated with highly compressed magnesium oxide and enclosed in a continuous copper or alloy steel (e.g., stainless steel) sheath with or without a nonmetallic jacket. It is manufactured in size 16 AWG to 500 kcmil single conductor; 16 AWG to 4 AWG, two and three conductor; 16 AWG to 6 AWG, four conductor; and 16 AWG to 10 AWG, seven conductor. The cable is rated 600 volts."

The MI that was run to the meter base that Roy showed us was multi conductor.

The MI in my pictures above and below is single conductor MI.

![](upload://8aUwQaiYn8QwxLlbzaosfh9g7tv.jpeg)

As this is single conductor MI you can see it is groups of four, Phase A, Phase B, Phase C and Neutral. The copper outer sheath serves as the grounding conductor.

These pictures where taken in a hospital, but we install MI in many building types. It is used to distribute emergency power from generators to the panels.

The reason it is used is it can survive running right through a fire for up to two hours.

It is a major pain to work with, its is heavy and stiff.

You would be very "unhappy" if you saw this stuff running through the ceiling and decided to tap into it for a new water feed.
![icon_eek.gif](upload://yuxgmvDDEGIQPAyP9sRnK0D0CCY.gif)


--
Bob Badger
Electrical Construction & Maintenance
Moderator at ECN

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Yup when that MO started leaking out you would be thinking “these folks have some hard water”


Originally Posted By: mcyr
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icon_biggrin.gif Thanks guys, I have never seen this before, and all goes to show you that there is always something to learn. Some parts of the Country did not popularize this product, and guess, Maine was one of them.


Thanks for the info.

Marcel


Originally Posted By: tallen
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Thanks Bob icon_biggrin.gif