Fewer inspectors are now able to pass our new entrance exam.

Originally Posted By: gromicko
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Since we released our new version of our entrance exam http://www.nachi.org/aboutexam.htm , fewer takers are able to pass. So few that our national statistics are reflecting it. Our overall passing rate is now down under 50%. That means that most people who have taken NACHI’s Online Inspector Exam…failed.


http://exams.nachi.org/stats.php


Nick


Originally Posted By: nlewis
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Nick,


Is that a good thing or a bad thing?


Does that mean fewer new members? icon_confused.gif


Originally Posted By: jpope
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Personally, I feel it’s a GREAT thing icon_razz.gif


Not that there are fewer members, but fewer UNQUALIFIED members. If it were simply a numbers game, there would BE no test, right?


--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: jburkeson
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Testing should be viewed as a minimum requirement not a master seal.


The NACHI test is designed to convey to those who do not pass that they are not really ready to perform home inspections in accordance with our 'Standards of Practice' or our 'Code of Ethics' and need more experience and training.


--
Joseph Burkeson, RPI (Hooperette)

?Anyone who has proclaimed violence his method inexorably must choose lying as his principle.?
~ Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Originally Posted By: gbeaumont
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Hi to all


I think it’s a great thing that our new exam is a little more difficult than the old one, not that I would want to see fewer new members but I would love to see those new members better educated. The good think is that they are able to participate in this forum whilst still studying, an are able to ask questions and seek help here. I hope that in future we are able to improve the quality of the exam further, but also be able to educate those who are interested in our business better as well.


BTW elsewhere on the board someone is looking for a ride along to help him pass our enterance exam, that is a great thing.

Regards

Gerry


--
Gerry Beaumont
NACHI Education Committee
e-mail : education@nachi.org
NACHI phone 484-429-5466

Inspection Depot Education
gbeaumont@inspectiondepot.com

"Education is a journey, not a destination"

Originally Posted By: jpope
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Joseph,


I agree, however, I also feel that even our MINIMUM standards should be set at a level where NACHI members are considered to be competent professionals.

This new exam simply "raised the bar" a little.


--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
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We turn away about 1/2 the people that want to join because they can’t pass the exam.


As I talk with so many inspector-want-to-be's I've noticed that most of them who fail come from the computer or IT industry and are looking to change professions.

Most who pass with flying colors are from the construction industry looking to do something less physically taxing.

I feel this shows we are turning away the 1/2 that shouldn't be out there doing inspections without further education or hands-on experience.

It also highlights how important a construction background is.

The entrance exam is our front gate and its working.

Nick


Originally Posted By: jrooff
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Hi all,


And I fully agree with Nick on the construction background. It should be almost mandatory of some kind of construction knowledge. I belive that alot of what I find in an inspection is not from the books on how to become an inspector, but what I have learned over the years in construction to make me more in tune to identify and explain my findings.


As for lighter work load, that pad and pen is a lot less work than lookin at a load of lumber or shingles just droped at the job site.LOL (but true)


Originally Posted By: rray
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I’ll disagree on the importance of a construction background.


"Over there," there is a thread on qualifications for hiring new inspectors. I prefer inspectors with zero experience in real estate or anything related to real estate. That way, they don't have any preconceived notions of how to do anything and won't overemphasize or de-emphasize any part of the inspection. All areas get equal billing.

I'm quite proud of my newest inspector. He came to me after working as a part-time clerk at Blockbuster. He's been with me for a couple of months but has only been doing inspections the last month. I've seen his improvement and gave him the opportunity the other day to take the NACHI exam. He passed with a 76. Unfortunately for NACHI, he can only join NACHI at this stage by doing one of two things: paying for it himself now or waiting until the company is ready to pay for him; and I have other goals that he must meet before I will pay for any memberships for him.

Much more important to me is willingness and enthusiasm for learning, verbal and written command of the English language, and advanced computer experience.


--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.

Originally Posted By: nlewis
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Russ,


I have a real problem with one thing you said. Blockbuster. They don't have a back room full of the good videos! I may have to settle for viewing the vitual librarian or ,God forbid, one the NACHI training videos.

Neal


Originally Posted By: rray
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nlewis wrote:
Blockbuster. They don't have a back room full of the good videos!

That's why Tony no longer works there! ![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif)


--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.

Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
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If a Blockbuster employee gets a 76, he can join. If a 30 year veteran General Contractor gets a 74, he can’t join.


Nick


Originally Posted By: rray
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Experience under my supervision is one of the requirements I have of my employees before I’ll pay for their membership. I also require them to make an “A.” 76 is a “C”.



Home inspections. . . .


One home at a time.


Originally Posted By: jrooff
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Man,


If I stepped on someone’s toes, Excuse me.


Originally Posted By: rray
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Hey, James.


I don't see anything in any of the posts that seems to indicate that you stepped on anyone's toes.


--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.

Originally Posted By: jrooff
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Russel,


Did I read somewhere on the message board that you had some construction experience in your background?


Originally Posted By: rray
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Well, yes and no. Licensed construction experience? No. Homeowner construction experience? Yes.


I grew up in a very large (Catholic/Mormon), very poor family in South Texas. We built our own homes, so I am familiar with and have built homes, chimneys, foundations, swimming pools, irrigation systems, etc., and also destroyed the same.

I remember the first house I helped build for my uncle. He had all his friends over to help him build the house. Foundation was first. They dug the foundation and then sat back under the shade and watched me put the rebar in place and tie it together with them dam* rebar ties. Never had so many cuts, blisters, bruises on my hands, arms, and legs. That's when I decided that I was not going to go into the construction business.

I've been directly involved with hundreds of property renovations in three states during the the past 30 years.


--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.

Originally Posted By: jonofrey
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gromicko wrote:

Most who pass with flying colors are from the construction industry looking to do something less physically taxing.

I feel this shows we are turning away the 1/2 that shouldn't be out there doing inspections without further education or hands-on experience.
Nick


Nick, do you have the stats on that or are you talking about a gut feeling?

From my relationships with builders and from the inspections that I've done, I'd have to say there are too many people in the residential construction industry that know exactly how to build something the wrong way. I'm with Russel on this one. I will agree that there is no substitute for hands on experience. That, in itself, does not make the best candidate. There are many good builders out there. I think they are hard to find and don't come cheap.


--
Inspection Nirvana!

We're NACHI. Get over it.

Originally Posted By: jrooff
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Russel,


I also grew up in construction but maybe a little different, at 15 yrs old running a 955k cat, back in '71 that was a big unit. Most of early construction was with my Dad and he lived by, If you can’t do it right then why do it, and the man new his sh$t. I still work that way today and don’t feel the school of hard knocks hurt me a bit, well maybe my back.


The inspections I’ve done came from realtors that know me. I’m not a wolf crier and I stick to the out line on my list, but I feel I know what I’m looking at when it come to supports, trusses,rafters,joist’s and what makes concrete walls crack a certain way. I don’t want to sound like I know everything!! I learn something new everyday. But I do understand there functions because I’ve put them there. And you feel that’s not an asset?


I must be missing something here but when I buy a truck I talk to my mechanic, plumbing a plumber you get the point and when you pick out a home inspector they know about houses. And when I came into this business all my research said the best candidates are ones with construction backgrounds.

I see your point I think, You prefer a greenhorn and you train him the way you want them to to the job for you.
But a lot of the inspectors are starting off on there own, that's where I'm comming from.


Originally Posted By: rray
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This is the only business where I am accepted as a Jack-of-all-trades. Many of my former companies hired me for something specific and then took advantage of me when they found out that I knew something about everything but everything about nothing.


I find home inspectors and Realtors to be very similar. Anyone can become a Realtor, and you'll find lots of various backgrounds. I know some former doctors, teachers, laborers, etc., who are now Realtors. Ditto home inspectors. They come from various backgrounds.

I would hire a construction laborer before I would hire a general contractor, though. It's a difference between "having done it" and "having scheduled it to be done."

The only thing I see where having a construction background might make a difference is in how long it takes to get up and running as a home inspector. As someone pointed out to me in a different thread on NACHI, I'm a "Humanist." I believe in the basic goodness, integrity, intelligence, etc., of mankind. If one has the interest and the desire, one can accomplish whatever one wants. If one is going to accomplish it under my purview, I prefer that they come from a non-real-estate-related industry.


--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.