Found bats in a apartment complex

I found alot of bats in a 102 year old apartment 6plex.
What do I do? One bat is bad enough, but a whole bat cave!..

they can be quite costly to get rid of…

Package and sell to China for bat soup.

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Do I report it just to my client? Do I go to the city? What if the client backs out of the buy and nothing ever gets done. One bat was in a apartment with little babies in there.

Which of the two hired you?

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I understand my client will have the report. I called him already to just give a heads up.
I am just concerned about the real scope of the problem…it’s a infestation, in a commercial property where kids and babies live… just want some advice.

You could always anonymously call the apartment complex management and/or the city building authority

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It it’s a situation where you really think there is a dire health concern in a complex affecting others, I would not hesitate calling the local health department to let them know what you observed. As far as your report, state what you observed and possible implications. Further evaluation required by the proper technicians and/or authorities.

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When I was in my 20s I heard of some guys that had a bat infestation in their work shop/garage.

They decided to start a fire in the wood stove, don scuba breathing tanks, motorcycle helmets and various other protective gear and set up many bright work lights facing the interior of the shop area.

I understood that they then covered the chimney of the small fired stove and the shop filled with smoke. Well, apparently bats don’t like smoke so the started flying around in the shop (the entry area had been plugged earlier). They said that when the entered the shop it was filled with brightly lit up flying bats, so the used tennis rackets to swat them down and had apparently enjoyed their good riddance of the bats.

Later, they said they stapled the dead bats to the sliding doors of the shop and spray painted their silhouettes. Then got rid of the 148 batts some where. I think they said they burned them.

Stories of our youth…

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Write hard. All the things you mentioned (potential significant health issues).

As far as reporting your observations to local authorities?
Personal decision.

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That’s “bat shit crazy” Larry. Wonder if if would work on some of our posters… :crazy_face:

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You’re making too much of this AND making it your problem. Its NOT

Report it to your client THEN move along

If you’re really concerned call the local health department to tell them THEN shut up and move along

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You can’t just kill bats here…although that scenario sounded like quite the party…and calling professionals is expensive …just tell the buyer what You saw and let them decide what to do…

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Context matters. Bats in the belfry? Bats in the basement? The units?

Describe what you saw IN BOLD TEXT, and if you like refer the client to both an expert
and public resources such as:
https://batworld.org/what-to-do-if-you-found_a_bat/

You can refer the client to a removal / rescue volunteer who may be able to handle the case at no charge. Unfortunately nothing shows up near Great Falls:
https://batworld.org/local-rescue/

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Definitely write up what you saw. Bat guano (feces) is unhealthy. There is also a risk of rabies. I would alert my customer, the owner of the property and also the local authorities since it is a public building. I found bats in an old church that my customer was going to convert to a home. There was several inches of guano all over the ceiling joists and plaster. I did some research (more than just a Google search) and found that it really is a serious health concern. It is illegal to kill bats with species listed on both state and federal endangered species lists… In my opinion you have a civic responsibility to report a public building with a health hazard.

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Bat guano removal is a must as the feces are a Major Health Hazard.

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Put it in the report!!
“Environmental Issue: There was evidence of bats and bat feces/urine (location). There are many openings around the eaves, gable vents, (etc as observed) that are entry points for bats. These areas should be sealed prior to the bats returning to the area.” Recommend professional removal!!

Bats are protected in many states, but when they leave in the evening, you can seal up the openings and they will relocate.(to the neighbor’s house) :crazy_face:

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That’s harsh, lol!!
image

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