GFCI below panel ?

(G) For a one-family dwelling, at least one receptacle outlet shall be installed in the areas specified in 210.52(G)(1) through (3). These receptacles shall be in addition to receptacles required for specific equipment.

(1) Garages. In each attached garage and in each detached garage with electric power. The branch circuit supplying this receptacle(s) shall not supply outlets outside of the garage. At least one receptacle outlet shall be installed for each car space.

This has no bearing on a receptacle installed in a basement feeding additional downstream receptacles outside. If the panel was in the garage it would, but the question as stated in post #1 did not specify the panel location.

Just quoted the link that was posted, nothing more.

Thanks Stephen.

Since the OP never said it seems like the assumption was that the panel was in the basement but as noted if it’s in the garage and under the 2014 NEC then the rules are different. Good catch. :cool:

I don’t have access to the 2014 where I am. That is why I asked for a code cite. It also allows others to read the new requirements.

Stephen has us covered with his post that actually went up prior to mine.

I see “at least one” in there, Chuck:

https://www.inkling.com/read/national-electrical-code-2014-fire-protection-association/chapter-2/iii--required-outlets

(G) Basements, Garages, and Accessory Buildings.
For a one-family dwelling,** at least one receptacle outlet shall be installed in the areas specified in 210.52(G)(1) through (3). **These receptacles shall be in addition to receptacles required for specific equipment.
(1) Garages.
In each attached garage and in each detached garage with electric power. The branch circuit supplying this receptacle(s) shall not supply outlets outside of the garage. At least one receptacle outlet shall be installed for each car space.^
(2) Accessory Buildings.
In each accessory building with electric power.
(3) Basements.
In each separate unfinished portion of a basement.

The garage is the only one that has a restriction on receptacles installed outside the area. The basement receptacle does not have the same restrictions.

I wonder what the thinking / debate was in regards to this change. I bet 80% of the homes built here in WA since the 90’s use the garage gfci to protect the front and rear exterior receptacles.

Paul Abernathy? You attend some of these hearings. Any comment?

Looks like you can find the info here regarding garages:

If you are asking purely on the basis of this question and as presented then my answer would be Yes.

Yes, I did attend and most of the debate centered around EV’s and potential for overloading branch circuits and all that jazz. The point about the branch circuit supplying other outlets not being permitted was again tied up with all that.

I actually have a 2017 NEC proposal to remove that part of the paragraph.

My opinion was that if the “at least one” receptacle is provided for by a branch circuit that happens to pick up the receptacle(s) for each car space (which also needs changing, and I did submit a change to vehicle spaces) , that this branch circuit can’t supply any outlets outside of the garage. However, I am of the opinion that this does not apply to another separately installed branch circuit for a different purpose. You will notice it says “this” when addressing the receptacle(s) governed by 210.52(G)(1).

“The branch circuit supplying “this” receptacle(s) shall not supply outlets outside of the garage.”

Now, GFCI would apply since 210.8(A)(2) is general to garages, 210.52(G)(1) in my opinion is governing those installed to meet 210.52…those installed for use other than as directed in 210.52(G)(1) are…in addition.

Anyway…agree to disagree with my opinion on this but I’m bias since I have a proposal submitted to remove the limitation to the circuit not supplying other outlets outside of the garage anyway.

Now leave me alone Stephen…lol…I was watching a movie…lol