GFCI

Originally Posted By: jrooney
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I couldn’t find reference to this exact question. 2, second floor baths on GFCI in series and the GFCI was in the 1st floor powder room.? seemed like an awful long way to go to reset? This was in a new home and the builder rep. assured me that it was correct.


Also in same house. Gas fireplace with electric on/off switch. Any height regs. so that the kiddies don't play with turning on/off/on/off. This is the very first one I've seen.


Originally Posted By: gbell
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I could find no reference in the 2002 NEC or the IRC.



Greg Bell


Bell Inspection Service

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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See 110.3(B) …



Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant


www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: gbell
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The instructions included with the outlet must specify.



Greg Bell


Bell Inspection Service

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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http://www.ul.com/consumers/groundfault.html


Quote:
Revised GFCI Standard addresses abnormal field conditions

Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs) have made an enormous difference to consumer safety by providing protection from electrocution both inside and outside the home. While pleased with the initial performance of GFCIs, a recent survey conducted jointly by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) in conjunction with UL indicated that a relatively small percentage of GFCIs in the field may not provide ground fault circuit protection either because the GFCI was improperly installed, or because of damage caused by events often unnoticeable by the user, such as power surges.

As a result, UL has revised ANSI/UL 943, "Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters," to address potential damage from abnormal field conditions.

UL adopted seven new certification requirements for GFCIs with an effective date of January 1, 2003. Four of the seven certification requirements have undergone the consensus process associated with the requirements for an ANSI/UL Standard for Safety and were published in September 2002 as revisions to ANSI/UL 943. These four revisions to the standard are part of the 4kV, 2kA Voltage Surge test, Abnormal Overvoltage test, Operating Mechanism test and Resistance to Environmental Noise test.

The remaining three items are still in the ANSI-required review process. These include proposed new Requirements for Resistance to Moisture and Corrosion test, New Requirements for Line-Load Miswire test and Power Denial if Miswired (Line Terminals) test. These requirements, although not published within the ANSI standard, remain as certification requirements for UL Listings. Other certification agencies may or may not be applying these additional requirements. UL intends to submit these items to the UL 943 Standards Technical Panel (STP) for consensus balloting in the near future.

The seventh certification requirement, the Supplemental Voltage Surge test, is presently required for UL Listing and is also undergoing the consensus process for inclusion in ANSI/UL 943.

Though products meeting these revised requirements will soon enter the marketplace, they are not required to have any special markings to distinguish them from models made before January 1, 2003. UL Listed GFCIs that were manufactured and labeled before the effective date of these new requirements still maintain their UL Listing and may continue to appear in the marketplace after January 1, 2003.

Even with new certification requirements, UL recommends that consumers test their GFCIs at least once a month to verify they are operating properly.

This information was current as of May 2003 and is presented here for archival purposes only. For current or additional information about GFCIs, contact John Konz in Melville, NY by e-mail at John.O.Konz@us.ul.com.



--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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James, there is no NEC rule about minimum switch height, on a fireplace or anything else. Disconnects need to be readily accessible but that just means you don’t need a ladder to reach it.


6’ 6" seems to be the defacto standard. ADA has some rules but they will end up making the switch lower.


As for the GFCI, every receptacle in every bathroom in the house could be on the same GFCI. Dumb design but legal. If they also pick up the fan and/or light in the bathroom they are limited to one bathroom per GFCI/20a circuit.


Originally Posted By: jrooney
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Thanks for your input all. I was concerned that I had missed something and just wanted to get it straight in my brain.