Glitch Bill is in! 3 ways to get a Florida Home Inspectors License.

Although we have some concern that unscrupulous inspectors will find defects that don’t exist in order to drum up unnecessary repair work, … our real concern is that honest contractors will simply begin to offer free legitimate inspections as lead generators for their contracting/repair firms. This would apply downward pressure on the fees our profession will be able to command.

Let me take the other side for a moment, for those who get many Realtor referrals.

Since Realtors are so bad and only recommend soft inspectors, who in their right mind would recommend a contractor that is going to find defects to drum up business? :wink:

I’m just sayin…

Nick,

SB1330 has a grandfather clause for mold assessor that requires a proctored exam.
468.8423 Grandfather clause.-863 (1) A person who performs mold assessment or mold 864remediation as defined in this part may qualify for licensure to 865be licensed by the department as a mold assessor or mold 866remediator if the person submits his or her application to the 867department by March 1, 2011, whether postmarked or delivered by 868that date, and if the person: meets the licensure requirements 869of this part by July 1, 2010.870 (a) Is certified as a mold assessor or mold remediator by 871a state or national association that requires, for such 872certification, successful completion of a proctored examination 873on mold assessment or mold remediation, as applicable, and 874completes at least 60 hours of education on mold assessment or 875at least 30 hours of education on mold remediation, as 876applicable; or
Any chance IAC2 could meet this requirement by establishing the proctored exam?

NICK: Good point from Robert. You are known for making miracles

PRO-LAB and InterNACHI already have a joint program in place for the mold exam. We have it covered.

I wonder if just having a proctored test will be sufficient or will the “certification for mold assessment” need to meet the national standard.
I have yet to meet a home inspector / IAC2 member that has the soon to be required $1 million liability with E&O for mold assessment. Just something else to consider.

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Last year ANSI approved NOCA standard 1100 for IAQ certifications. Getting ANSI approval generally takes a couple years.
The new standard confirms and codifies three groups that have policies that qualify them as certification programs under the national Standard 1100.

  1. The American Board of Industrial Hygiene (ABIH) which offers the Certified Industrial Hygienist, CIH designation.

  2. The American Council for Accredited Certification, (ACAC) www.acac.org](http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=vspakfdab.0.0.amkpybcab.0&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.acac.org%2F&id=preview) which offers several designations including:

  3. The Board of Certified Safety Professionals which offers the Certified Safety Professional, CSP designation.

If only a couple certifications meet the ANSI approved national standard, seems logical to use their certifications. Guess the question becomes when is a certification a certification.
Will the state ignore the lengths groups like ACAC went to improve their certification process?
ACAC programs are accredited by the Council for Engineering and Scientific Specialty Boards (CESB).
ACAC is a candidate for ANSI accreditation under ANSI/ISO/IEC 17024.
ACAC examinations are compliant with standards published by AERA, APA and NCME.
ACAC is a member of the National Organization for Competency Assurance (NOCA).

It will be interesting to see how it all shakes out.

Just for information, I sent an email to Senator Bennett this morning with the concern about the issue of making repairs on homes after closing. I suggested that they should follow our COE and make it so that you could not make repairs for 1 year after the inspection. This is the response I received from his office:

Mr. Sole,
Senator Bennett agrees with your concerns and the issue will be addressed next week in Committee. There will be an amendment to fix that.
Thanks.
Cheryl

Cheryl Ennis
Chief Legislative Aide
**Cell: 941-504-5359 **
TLH: 850-487-5080
Dist: 941-727-6349
Senator Michael “Mike” Bennett
District 21

Sometimes they do pay attention. Everyone needs to contact their senators and congressmen as soon as possible.

Nice! :smiley:

This is good because that is already happening. Some contractors are not calling it a home inspection but offering a free “analysis” and then presenting the buyer with a list of needed repairs thus skipping the home inspection altogether. At the same time they are selling the wind mitgation inspections on a home that is not even yet owned by the buyer for incredibly small fees. Again, the vast majority of the homes are not ready for a wind mitigation inspection as very few have any kind of hardening systems in place for the openings. Realtors are getting in on this as well, asking that wind mit inspections be done at the same time as the home inspection. All they know is if you get a wind inspection the insurance company will reduce the premiums. Those who do them know this is not true but the agents are fixated and ill informed as to what a wind mit inspection is, or does or what the entire process entails. FL created this cluster then bailed out when they got threatened with lawsuits.

It is a regular practice in the WDO treatment industry.

Nick,
how will they want us to prove how many inspections we have done? I think many of us would like to get a head start on having the proof ready.

Why shouldn’t a G.C. be able to do the work. I know it is against the Internachi code of ethics but I do not agree. If a person is qualified to do the work then why stop them. Yes i am a General Contractor as well as a home inspector.

As a professional home inspector ( consultant ) you are paid by a home buyer to assist them in determining if the property they made an offer on is worth buying.
This has to be completely unbiased, with the inspector having no interest in the transaction other than that of the client.
The possibility that the company performing a 300.00 service could generate thousands of dollars in additional income is an ethical conflict of interest and could potentially harm the consumer.
The number one reason the state regulates any profession is TO PROTECT THE CONSUMER.

Mr. Meeker,

As a full certified member of NACHI, you have agreed to be bound by the Code of Ethics. See the following:

"The InterNACHI member shall not perform or offer to perform, for an additional fee, any repairs or repair-associated services to structure on which the member or member’s company has prepared a home inspection report, for a period of 12 months. This provision shall not include services to components and/or systems which are not included in the InterNACHI standards of practice. "

I think that the above section is clear with respect to repair work by inspectors.

Steve Taylor
Taylor Inspection Services, Inc.
Atlantic Beach Florida 32233
904-206-0370
www.taylorinspectionservices.com

Hi there, as others have said it has always been an ethical issue not only for the trade associations but also for many if not all HI licensed states who have recognised the potential conflict and have seen fit to legislate against it for the benefit of the home buying public.

Regards

Gerry

Gerry, I’m on my way back to Tallahassee tonight. Will you be around?

[quote=“staylor7, post:34, topic:46065”]

Mr. Meeker,

As a full certified member of NACHI, you have agreed to be bound by the Code of Ethics. See the following:

"The InterNACHI member shall not perform or offer to perform, for an additional fee, any repairs or repair-associated services to structure on which the member or member’s company has prepared a home inspection report, for a period of 12 months. This provision shall not include services to components and/or systems which are not included in the InterNACHI standards of practice. "

I think that the above section is clear with respect to repair work by inspectors.

Steve,

I am aware of the code of ethics I just do not agree with them and hope things stay the way the state is trying to by calling for no work untill after closing. I am aware as a member of Internachi I will not be able to do anything that is against the code of ethics but I do want my opinion heard.

Nick,
How will they be verifing how many inspections we have done and will any type of home inspection count? “4 point, wind mitigation, citizens roof condition, etc…”

Hi Nick, around Tampa yes, around Tallahassee no. I’m generaly not considered “PC” enough for that town :wink:

Regards

Gerry

Can i inspect something after i’ve done the work as opposed to doing the work after i’ve inspected?

Gerry, I’ll call you from Tallahassee tomorrow. I should be on the ground through Friday afternoon.