hard wiring extension cord??

Originally Posted By: srowe
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Does anyone have a NEC reference for hard wiring an extension chord into a pump. Appears non-standard to me, sorry I don’t have the whole picture. Basically it was multiple outlet extension chord that was cut and spliced into the junction box. Thanks!


![](upload://1DQCgu2fbXSD3rVgO7I9JHfKOVS.jpeg)


Originally Posted By: Thomas Ogryski
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400.7(A)(6) Connection of utilization equipment to facilitate frequent interchange


400.7(A)(7) Prevention of the transmission of noise or vibration


Those are two that could apply. However, shoving the cord up under the edge of the cover certainly doesn't cut the mustard codewise. How about the location of that pump? If it is outdoors exposed to rain, the pressure switch may not be raintight and the motor certainly doesn't appear to be either.

Tom


Originally Posted By: Thomas Ogryski
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I may have overlooked the obvious, does the pump get fed by the cord or does the pump circuit feed the cord? If it is the latter, then the usage does not meet any of the permitted uses in 400.7 and may be a Uses Not Permitted violation of 400.8(1) As a substitutefor the fixed wiring of a structure.


Originally Posted By: rmoore
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I’d just stick with… 300.4 Protection Against Physical Damage. Where subject to physical damage, conductors shall be adequately protected.


Even if you were allowed to use the control box as a junction box, and were allowed to hardwire an extension cord, then you would still have to provide some strain relief and protection from that sharp looking edge.

Code, Schmode...It's just plain wrong!


Originally Posted By: srowe
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The pump circuit feeds the chord. The gray wire feeds the pump, the yellow chord feeds a couple of items (can’t remember exactly). I will haver to back and take another photo.


Originally Posted By: jpope
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means of power supply.


Plus, the NM isn't listed for wet locations.


Originally Posted By: bbadger
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rmoore wrote:
Code, Schmode...It's just plain wrong!


![icon_lol.gif](upload://zEgbBCXRskkCTwEux7Bi20ZySza.gif)

How can you argue with that?


Originally Posted By: rmoore
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duplicate deleted


Originally Posted By: rmoore
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LOL…


Don't get me wrong. Electricity is an invisble dragon as far as I'm concerned and I rely on the codes in this area, more than any other, to tell me what is allowable. But, when I see something like Shawn's photo, or this... [ Image: Circuit wiring for idiots ] ...it's a no-brainer to simply report it as an "unacceptable wiring method in need of prompt repair".


--
Richard Moore
Rest Assured Inspection Services
Seattle, WA
www.rainspect.com

Originally Posted By: jsieg
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First if that NM wire is being fed to an exterior device it needs to be UV protected (UF wire or in conduit) (just the basics not going to get into the complete proper way to wire).


Second the pump should be a designated circuit!! (nothing else on the same circuit)

Third all pumps need to be in some kind of an enclousure to protect it from weather, animals, etc.

fourth pump switches are not rated nor do they have enough space within them for multible wires. ( They have moving parts in them that need to be able to move freely!!)

Lastly It does not look like the switch is properly grounded... from what I am seeing from the photo the green grounding screw does not have any wire under it. Pumps create a lot of static electricty... (lightning kills and is a form of static electricty(it can be argued that all electricty is static))... (stated for theatrical effect).

*** Most electrical (wiring) problems are normaly not just one thing done incorrectly but many things done incorrectly. It is said that electrical fires are not normaly caused by just one abnormal thing happening but several things that came together all at the same time to cause the fire.

Comments welcome!


Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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Shallow well pumps like that are usually listed wet location, even though you folks up north probably won’t see them installed outside (freezing).


It is pretty common in South Florida. The NM is just wrong, you can’t use it in a wet location, conduit or not. Same for the “romex” connector. The switch is bonded to the pump via the nipple but we don’t know if it is grounded properly. The cord is wrong because of the permanent wiring issue and the lack of the proper connector.


Whether this is a dedicated circuit or not is a design issue somewhat based on the FLA of the motor. It is common to have the other water processing equipment on that circuit.


Originally Posted By: jsieg
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The pump may be rated for wet location but that is not the issue… the switch is Not rated for wet location.


As for the switch being bonded to the pump, that is not proper electrical wiring... that's like saying that a metal electrical that is grounded would be safe (proper) wiring for a recepticle in that box without connecting the ground screw to that ground wire... (that's saying the mounting scerws ground the recepticle.)

Now for the pump being on it's own designated circuit... Would you tell me that a sump pump, a sewage pump, a refrigator (motor or freon pump) are not required to be on their own designated circuits. Other water processong equipment like water softners, filters, etc. should be on a different circuit than a pump motor...

It must be said again... The hole thing is just plain wrong. Hire an electrican and not your friend to wire the thing properly.


Originally Posted By: bbadger
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jsieg wrote:
Now for the pump being on it's own designated circuit... Would you tell me that a sump pump, a sewage pump, a refrigator (motor or freon pump) are not required to be on their own designated circuits. Other water processong equipment like water softners, filters, etc. should be on a different circuit than a pump motor


Yes I will tell you that.

There is nothing in the NEC that requires a sump pump, a sewage pump, a refrigerator (motor or freon pump) to be on a dedicated circuit.

You may like them to be and thats fine but it is not a code requirement.

jsieg wrote:
that a metal electrical that is grounded would be safe (proper) wiring for a recepticle in that box without connecting the ground screw to that ground wire...


There are many instances that the NEC does not require me to use the grounding terminal of a receptacle.

jsieg wrote:
(that's saying the mounting scerws ground the recepticle.)


Are you saying I can not use the mounting screws to ground the receptacles?

I can use 'self grounding' receptacles. 250.146(B)

I suggest you look at all of 250.146 before you go off half cocked. ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)

Bob


--
Bob Badger
Electrical Construction & Maintenance
Moderator at ECN

Originally Posted By: srowe
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Thank You everyone for your comments! I just needed back up on this. The installer, a local water systems company, installed everything the “same way has been doing it for the last 30 years” and “it is all to code”, as he said angrily. There was no talking to this man. Anyway, went back to get a picture today, the seller already had the electrician there to fix it even though the installer said it was correct. She listened to me, NOT him.


b.t.w. That is NOT nm, it is UF (labeled). Also, the plugs in the extension cord go to the softeners system. ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)

Here is the full photo:



Originally Posted By: pabernathy
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Hmmm…how about suggesting a proper connector for damp and wet locations rather than a standard NM cable connector…just in case rain wicks down the connector and into the wire area…


Art 314.15(A) 2002 NEC


--
Paul W. Abernathy- NACHI Certified
Electrical Service Specialists
Licensed Master Electrician
Electrical Contractor
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Visit our website- www.electrical-ess.com

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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This is pretty much the way most pumps are installed. They never get inspected. You could ask questions about how the pump is mounted, how the UF is supported and strapped, the question asked above about whether the switch is wet location listed (they don’t say wet or dry in the instructions or listing).


Typically in the cover is up they say they are OK.


The reality is all of these pumps stay wet.


Things like “in use covers” and such are virtually non-existant in the pump installer world.


I have a legal pump and water system installation if you want some pictures but it is one of a kind.
I did it because I got tired of screwing with "no water" problems at midnight.

I just looked on the Square D site and the 3R rating seems to be dependant on mounting orientation. I still can't find a picture of an F type switch that looks any different.


Originally Posted By: John Steinke
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This probably ins’t an “NEC” issue so much as a “listing” issue. I will outline some of the things a testing lab would consider, were such a thing submitted for evaluation.


First of all, cords have to be attached in such a manner that both protects the conductors from abrasion, and which relieves any strain- without that strain being transmitted to the electrical connections.
With that in mind, the connection of the UF to the pump with the two-screw connector may not be adequate; the connector should be one approved for UF.
In a similar manneer, the orange cord needs a proper connection to the housing. Since this part is more likely to be subjected to pulls and tugs, a better connector would likely be required- such as one of those with the rubber bushings in them. Passint unprotected conductors through a seam in the metalwork is not acceptable.

The size of the wiring chamber would be considered...is there enought room for the wires? I doubt this box has enough room.

Finally, there is the matter of over-current protection. If the pump is, say, a 220v 30A, with the "receptacles" tapped from the feed.....well, this would not be allowed.

If I had to describe this installation, I would note that the pump appears to have been modified in a manner inconsistant with its' listing, and seems to violate several generally accepted wiring practices.
I might also note that work such as this suggests that work was performed by an untrained person- and that a closer inspection of work performed by this person is warranted.