How many lives have been saved by this device?

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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How many lives have been saved by this device?


I think that there have been many lives saved, and the HI should always check for, and test them when they are installed as per the code in effect when the home was built.

If there were no rules requiring them, then recommending them would be in the interest of safety!

![](upload://x783x8AlCyNnohN1Z2JagPfmZvF.jpeg)


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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I check for GFCI’s and recommend them to be installed if they are not present for safety.


How are we supposed to know what code was in effect in what jurisdiction at what time?


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Joe T,


I don't really get into the "when" thing with the codes. GFCI protection is always recommended in my reports, regardless of when and where it was required. What I know, it is required now and I recommend it be upgraded now, for safety reasons.

While there are many home owners that fight replacement, usually indicating it was not required when it was installed my typical reply is:

First, can you provide documentation when it was installed? (usually no)
Can you tell us who installed it? (usually no)
Can you tell us if they pulled a permit with the township for this work? (usually no)
Can you ask the township to provide us with times and dates when the work was completed? (usually no)
If you can not provide me with specific dates and times, how exactly do you know it was not required when it was installed? DAH........

After all those no's, you can tell the home owner all of a sudden becomes much more likely just to replace them, since it is not really all that expensive and much less difficult and time consuming that going through all the above! ![icon_cool.gif](upload://oPnLkqdJc33Dyf2uA3TQwRkfhwd.gif)


--
Joe Myers
A & N Inspections, Inc.
http://anii.biz

Originally Posted By: evandeven
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How many people have been killed because of failed ones?



Eric Van De Ven


Owner/Inspector


Magnum Inspections Inc.


I get paid to be suspicious when there is nothing to be suspicious about!


www.magnuminspections.com

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



evandeven


Can you supply some specific cases?

Read the following report, the HI was helpful and they found GFCI's that did not work. Have you found many?

http://www.cpsc.gov/volstd/gfci/AnalysisGFCI.pdf

![icon_rolleyes.gif](upload://iqxt7ABYC2TEBomNkCmZARIrQr6.gif)


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Quote:
Have you found many?


Probably in 6 out of 10 homes over 3 years old. Homeowners almost never check them. I can't tell you how many times I've heard someone ask what the buttons are for.


Originally Posted By: pdacey
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bwiley wrote:
Probably in 6 out of 10 homes over 3 years old. Homeowners almost never check them. I can't tell you how many times I've heard someone ask what the buttons are for.


Same here. I tell everyone to test them every 30-45 days.


--
Slainte!

Patrick Dacey
swi@satx.rr.com
TREC # 6636
www.southwestinspections.com

Originally Posted By: evandeven
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The reason I asked is that I find, on average, 50% do not trip when tested. Another 20% are wired incorrectly.


I personally believe that G.F.I. outlets are a false sense of security.


--
Eric Van De Ven
Owner/Inspector
Magnum Inspections Inc.
I get paid to be suspicious when there is nothing to be suspicious about!
www.magnuminspections.com

Originally Posted By: jmyers
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Eric,


I don't believe GFCI's give the impression of a false sense of security, I believe since they are mechanical they are subject to failure just like everything else in this world.

I for one, would much rather be shocked from a circuit that has a 50% chance of saving my life rather than no chance. ![icon_biggrin.gif](upload://iKNGSw3qcRIEmXySa8gItY6Gczg.gif)

Like yourself, I do find many that are either defective, or improperly wired. I look at it this way, that is where I can make a difference in this world by telling everyone the don't work.

I also find it dis-heartening that many don't even know what they are for, or what the buttons on them do. You would think that more people would be better informed about their own safety and the safety of their loved ones.

For now, I just have to live with saving one family at a time, at least until they call me to do an inspection.


--
Joe Myers
A & N Inspections, Inc.
http://anii.biz

Originally Posted By: lkage
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Yes. What Joe said. eusa_clap.gif


Originally Posted By: sbyrnes
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Since we are on the topic of GFCI’s, I’ve come across the occasional outlet that when I place the tester in the outlet it immediately trips. This is before I hit the trip button. I thought it was my tester, but another GFCI in the same house would test fine so I know it’s not the tester. I write them up as not functioning properly. Would this be correct?



All Corners Home Inspections, Inc


Serving Pasco, Hernando, N. Pinellas & N. Hillsborough counties

Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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Your tester does present a certain amount of fault current, that is what lights the “ground” light and tests the neutral to ground path. If this alone trips the GFCI, I would suspect that there is significant ground fault current present already and your tester is just “the straw…”


I suppose it could be a bad GFCI but it would not be the first thing I suspected. I bet if you removed the load side conductors the problem would go away. I also bet the homeowner knows where that reset button is. icon_wink.gif