"How to Inspect the Exterior" Course

(Tyson L. Morozs) #21

Great course Ben! Defensible space was new to me and I added it to my template so thanks!

A question about brick veneer: If we find walls with no weeps in walls that are veneers, should we recommend drilling them? I am in Denver so my thoughts were always that we are pretty dry here and weeps may not be necessary.

Also, I have seen vents at the top of brick veneers (open joints with a mesh material) on newer buildings creating better air flow. I thought you may want this to be included on future editions of this course.

Thanks again!

(Jeffrey R. Jonas) #22

[quote="tmorozs, post:21, topic:58830"]

Great course Ben! Defensible space was new to me and I added it to my template so thanks!

A question about brick veneer: If we find walls with no weeps in walls that are veneers, should we recommend drilling them? I am in Denver so my thoughts were always that we are pretty dry here and weeps may not be necessary.

Also, I have seen vents at the top of brick veneers (open joints with a mesh material) on newer buildings creating better air flow. I thought you may want this to be included on future editions of this course.

Thanks again!
[/QUOTE]

Uh... those are the weeps and they belong at the bottom of the wall. Oops! ;-)

(Tyson L. Morozs) #23

From a bit of research, this would accomplish a rain screen effect. CavClear weeps or open joints are used at the top courses when not venting wall to an attic.

Here's one detail I found:
http://www.aecinfo.com/1/resourcefile/06/97/31/default69731_1.html

(John Vesey) #24

Alrighty here we go!

(Anthony J. Paluzzi) #25

starting exterior inspections

(Henedina Jessop) #26

Thank you for the course. I like how it all interconnects with the lessons learned previously.

(John Paul de Oliveira, GB-2 #86934 / AB #44580) #27

Great courses Ben!

I would like to make a suggestion of adding an 'unprimed' wood
surface for a cause of peeling paint, in section 8.8 as a poorly
prepared wood surface. It might help HI with understanding
why it happens. When wood isn't primed, paint peels off in
sheets, within a year or two. Or three :)

(Philip Apap) #28

This has been a very informative course..Thanks to all of those at INTERNACHI

(Allan Tjepkema) #29

Looking forward to this coarse

(Bob Elliott, 450.0002662) #30

We used this course for CE at the Chicago chapter tonight.
Good course though noticed a mistake in the graphics at one point.

See if anyone notices.

exterior course ooopsy.jpg

(Nick Gromicko, CMI) #31

I can't see it. Can you tell me what the error is so that I can have it researched and updated if necessary.

(Ben J. Gromicko) #32

I don’t see it. Email me and I can correct it, and you can keep this “quiz” going. Thanks.
ben@internachi.org
And I’ll also correct the graphic in our library at http://www.nachi.org/gallery/exterior/general/door-details-bw.jpg

(Nick Gromicko, CMI) #33

Here is the page in the course: http://www.education.nachi.org/show.php?course_id=64&element_id=1466

(Bob Elliott, 450.0002662) #34

[quote="gromicko, post:31, topic:58830"]

I can't see it. Can you tell me what the error is so that I can have it researched and updated if necessary.
[/QUOTE]

That page has the same graphic pictured twice.The graphic at bottom should be of a column but is not.
I can look it up for page number later tonight if you wish.Just something I caught when skimming through for testing.

(Ben J. Gromicko) #35

[quote="belliott, post:34, topic:58830"]

That page has the same graphic pictured twice.The graphic at bottom should be of a column but is not.

[/QUOTE]

Hi, Bob. The graphic at the bottom of the page is correctly used. The graphic is identifying a pilaster. If a column projects from the house wall, it is called a pilaster. The pilaster is used to give the appearance of a supporting column.
http://www.education.nachi.org/show.php?course_id=64&element_id=1466

(Bob Elliott, 450.0002662) #36

Cornice
Graphic of Cornice

Entablature
Graphic of Entablature

Pediment
Graphic of Pediment

Columns
Same graphic of pediment and no Graphic of Column

Surely you must see the logic of it being a misplaced title or graphic.

(Marcel R. Cyr, CMI) #37

Ben is correct Bob in using that graphic to show the pediment and columns of an entry way.
In this case the columns are half columns, so they are normally called pilasters in this case.

http://www.education.nachi.org/coursemedia/course-64/images/door-details-2.jpg

The graphic can be used for both.
:)

(Bob Elliott, 450.0002662) #38

Thanks for repeating the graphic I posted but still see no arrow pointing to column though you are a good man for sticking up for a chum.
Still wrong because every header title has a graphic pointing to the titled except for that one but maybe you just do not get it.

(Christopher Currins, CMI) #39

[quote="belliott, post:38, topic:58830"]

Thanks for repeating the graphic I posted but still see **no arrow pointing to column **though you are a good man for sticking up for a chum.
Still wrong because every header title has a graphic pointing to the titled except for that one but maybe you just do not get it.
[/QUOTE]

The arrow is pointing to the pilaster (Column).

"If the column projects from the house wall, it is called a pilaster. The pilaster is used to give the appearance of a supporting column. "

I kind of see what you're saying, the header should say "Decorative Columns".

But if you read all of the info below the graphic it does a good job explaining the difference between structural and decorative.

(Marcel R. Cyr, CMI) #40

It is obvious that you are the one that don’t get it. Or don’t know when a column becomes a pilaster.

door-details-2.jpg

door-details-2.jpg