How To Perform Deck Inspections Video Course

I thought the course as a whole was very well done. The required additional reading was a little redundant considering we went over all of this in the course.

Pic of a plumbing pipe in a house inspected.

Hello everybody.

This is the decks winter conditions. Hopefully not scary things will be revealed when this comes down. Hopefully soon, Spring!!
MGW

Hello everyone,
I tool 3 photos of my rented home’s balcony.
There seem to be some str.uctural flaws holding the railing up, including cracks in the foundation, bolts that don’t appear to be attached completely flush, and the area where the concrete and soil appear to need to be more filled up and pressurized

Hi everyone. I’m taking the 120 hour course before I take my test here in Fl. I have to post a pic of a deck member. I found this old picture of my sister’s deck. It shows some lattice, post, and handrail section.

This deck was installed off of a second story master bedroom. Nails are improperly securing this ledger board to the band joist. I probably shouldn’t have even gone onto this deck. There also doesn’t appear to be flashing under the ledger board.

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Inspecting decks for me has turned out to be one of the more involved aspects of the exterior inspection. There are numerous components to ensure are working together to provide the structural integrity needed for a safe deck. The checklist didn’t provide much in the way of inspecting a deck, just whether or not it was inspected. This is my second time going through the course, I plan on going through it at least 10 more times to make sure the information sticks. Deck safety is too critical not to be thorough.

The article I chose to read was Inspecting a Deck, Illustrated. I chose this article to reinforce the information in the course. Decks, especially off of second story homes are common in my region. There is a lot of information on decks to absorb so I found the illustrations very beneficial at providing a visual context to go along with the text. Safe decks save lives, there’s no question about it. The article will make a great reference in the feature if something slips my mind in the moment or I just want to double check something.

Deck_photo.JPG
This picture shows that the ballusters are greater than 4 OC and post are not placed every 6’

Keith,
I commend you for your dedication to learning about Deck construction/safety.
A very useful resource for more detailed information is from the Manufacturer Simpson Strong-Tie. Their online website has most all information you will ever need regarding proper construction hardware for all construction projects. They offer online training courses, and their live event schedule for your area is at: http://training.strongtie.com/stc/sstpub/psciis.dll?CLASSMENU=sstpub&searchoption=FIELDS&fisDirectList=1&field0=hide&value0=No&field1=XOWNER&value1=22 . I have attended both live and online events, and highly recommend them both for new inspectors as well as veterans. Peruse their website, and be sure to bookmark it for further referencing. Good luck!

Starting

2013 properties under management 167.JPG:
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I have been inspecting decks as part of home inspections for 8 years. This is a very in depth valuable course.

Decks are not common where I live in South Florida, i do not have an image to share with you all. However, I did spend some time at my moms house in Colorado, decks are very common there, and most are in bad shape as I assume the snow is the cause of the problem. Would love someone’s input on that.

This deck railing has no blusterers and will not pass the 4" ball test. It is unsafe for small children.

Heck… it’s unsafe for an adult who’s had too many!

Attachment-1.jpeg Neighbors Deck

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For Reading Assignment I read (Deck Inspection Illustrated and Deck Receptacles).

required image:
I have no access to a property with a deck.

Required report:
I have no access to a property with a deck with which to make a report.