Importance of the AHJ check

Just to point out an example of how important to find out all the pertinent information that is available through your AHJ of where ever your inspection may be. Here is an example of my State where this City is way different than mine.

And finally, I have found where a 4" step is required between the garage and home on an attached situation. It is locally mandated from AHJ's of like this one.

http://www.sacomaine.org/departments/codes/codesinuse.shtml

Look un Amendments to Building Codes.

Hope this helps a few.

Marcel :) :) :D
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I use the Massachusetts Building Codes site periodically.

David;

Is the 4" step at garage to house required in your area.

How do the Massachusetts Building Codes differ from the IBC?

Marcel

Massachusetts is on its sixth edition of building code revisions and (like any other State) the codes are not fully compatible with the IBC. Here is a comprehensive list of which chapters are and are not compatible with IBC's.

Chapter 1 is considered unique to Massachusetts. Essentially it is a combination of Fifth Edition requirements and the national document.Some of the major changes in Chapter 1 occur in Section 105.

Although many definitions are provided for in Chapter 2, the national code chooses to separate others and place them within the chapter in which they most closely relate. For instance, words and terms specific to means of egress requirements are found in Chapter 10, not Chapter 2.

Chapter 3 is compatible with the national code. However, portions of Section 313.0, Mixed Use Groups, are effected by changes that occur in Chapter 9 relative to fire suppression requirements of certain buildings.

Chapter 4 is consistent with the National Code from Sections 401.0 to 421.0 excepting changes incorporated due to conflicts with Massachusetts laws and\or regulations, such as those that occur in Section 603.0, defining the limits of high rise buildings, and Section 421.0, defining requirements for
inground swimming pools. Chapter 4 is significantly different than the compatible Fifth Edition of the code.

Chapter 5 is almost entirely compatible with the national code, excepting the addition of note m to Table 503 which cautions the code user to a distinction of Massachusetts general law requiring hospitals, other than college or school infirmaries, to be erected of Type 1B construction or better. Chapter 5 is very similar to the comparable Fifth Edition article.

Chapter 6, 7, & 8 are entirely compatible with the national code.

Chapter 9 is significantly different than the national code and is considered unique to the Commonwealth, particularly in its requirements for fire suppression systems.

Chapter 10 is nearly compatible to the national code. Changes appear in limited sections.

The provisions of Chapter 11 as they appear in the national code have been deleted. The code user is cautioned that there may be significant differences from the national code, and should refer only to 521 CMR for regulations pertaining to building accessibility.

Chapter 11 (fifth edition) changes slightly.

Chapter 12 now includes Rat-proofing requirements.

Chapter 13 of the Code does not yet require that new construction low-rise residential buildings conform to the requirements of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) Model Energy Code, 1995 version (MEC95).

Chapter 14 is entirely compatible with the national code.

Chapter 15 is entirely compatible with the national code, except, generic language referring to climactic conditions not relevant to the Commonwealth have been deleted.

The provisions of Chapter 16 were reviewed and further developed by both the Loads and the Seismic Advisory Committees whose make-up are defined in the forward of the code. Wind load provisions have been simplified; snow load zones are considered unique to Massachusetts; the use of importance factors for snow load design is not utilized; seismic design is based on a peak velocity related acceleration (av) of 0.12 throughout the entire state; superfluous requirements dealing with loading criteria outside Massachusetts have been deleted.

Chapter 17 provisions are similar to the national code but are enhanced by requiring a specific program of testing and inspections of critical structural items to be developed by the Structural Engineer of record.

The provisions of Chapter 18 were reviewed and further developed by the Geotechnical Advisory Committee whose make-up is defined in the forward of the code.

The provisions in Chapter 19 & 20 are essentially the same as the national code.

The provisions in Chapter 21 are essentially the same as the national code with the exception of reinforcing requirements.

The provisions in Chapter 22 are essentially the same as the national code with the exception of the inclusion of the provisions of the “Interim Guidelines for Steel Moment Frame Structures” (FEMA 267 - August 1995).

The provisions of Chapter 23 are essentially the same as the national code with the exception of the inclusion of text for the use of native lumber.
Chapter 24 reflects the provisions of the 1996 national building code, and is different only to remain compatible with Massachusetts general law.

Chapter 25 & 26 is entirely compatible with the national code.

Chapter 27 has been deleted from the national code in its entirety. Electrical wiring and equipment is regulated by a separate state agency, and is made part of the code by reference.

Chapter 28 of the Sixth Edition of the code contains Section 2812.0 which sets forth requirements for power venters and acknowledges other jurisdictions which also regulate the installation of power venters (Board of Fire Prevention Regulations for oil-fired appliances; see 527 CMR and the Plumbing and Gas Board for gas-fired appliances; see 248 CMR).

Chapter 29 states Massachusetts plumbing and gas requirements are controlled by the Plumbing and Gas Code - 248 CMR and promulgated by the Plumbing and Gas Board and such requirements are typically not controlled by the State Building Code.

Chapter 30 of the Massachusetts elevator requirements are controlled by the Elevator Regulations - 524 CMR, promulgated by the Board of Elevator Regulations and such requirements are typically not controlled by the State
Building Code.

Chapter 31 is essentially the same as the national code. However, substantive changes have been made tothe Flood Resistant Construction provisions of Section 3107.0. Additional changes have been made to remain compatible with Massachusetts general law and regulation.

Chapter 32 & 33 are essentially the same as the national code, changed only to remain compatible with Massachusetts general law and regulation.

Chapter 34 has been substantially modified from the national code in terms of technical content and format.

Chapter 35 in concept and specific requirements is unique to Massachusetts.

Chapter 36 utilizes the general format of the CABO ONE AND TWO FAMILY DWELLING CODE, 1995 EDITION, but is significantly altered throughout to reflect Massachusetts requirements.

Wow, Can I get any more detailed?

Absolutely....

*Massachusetts CMR (sixth edition) *

407.5 Door sills:

The sills of all door openings between private garages and adjacent interior spaces shall be raised not less than four inches (102 mm) above the garage floor.

Thanks David;

It is unreal how they can modify their Codes, isn't it?

I guess a lot of Cities are doing it and further emphazises the effort on our part to find out the Code structure for whatever area we are inspecting.

Thanks.:)

Yes Sir.

If I were researching codes to specific violations, I refer to the State code before I would go to National codes.