In need of some advice

Well, I’m 19 live in central FL, and I have recently heard about the business of mold inspection/remediation. A friend of mine works for someone who does this, and apparently he is making good money.
I currently work at my family hardware store, but would like to start a worth wile career for myself, and thought this could be a good option.

I have seen a few “schools” online that either have online courses, or send out material for you to study, then you take a test and you are then a certified CMI/CMRC. The one that looks the best to me is through MICRO.

If anyone can make a recomendation of a good “school” it would be appreciated.

Other than that, if you guys can give me some good general advice/information that would be good for someone just getting into the business, or otherwise direct me to a post(s) that might help me, it would be of great help.

This seems like a good forum full of information, I just don’t know where to find it yet.

Thanks

JD

Please do a search for this man and read his post’s.
Caoimhín P. Connell
Here is one to start
http://www.nachi.org/forum/showthread.php?t=11200&highlight=Mould

Roy Cooke

So, is this an attemp to keep me from getting into CMI and CMRC?

Are you trying to tell me not to waste my time because when people figure out that mold is, in reality not dangerous at all, I will be out of business?

Roy is only giving you some very good advice.

There is a lot to learn from Mr. Connell and you will need all the knowledge you can get. The more you know, and understand, the better job you can do. This is true of any profession.

Education is the only answer to being successfull.

Cheers, and best wishes in your venture. Keep learning and you will do well.

PRO-LABS (located in Florida) offers training in mold sampling.
www.reliablelab.com

I see, from that first post of mr. Connell it seemed like he was against CMIs all together, sayint that there is no proof that any mold if harmful to people.

But reading other posts, I see he thinks sampleing and testing is not needed.
But there is a need for honest inspectors and remediators, I see Mr Connell is a very educated man on the subject of mold, and will continue to read his information.

Thanks for the help so far, keep it coming guys…

IT doesn’t look like they have any at home education, Im looking for something I can do either online or at home study…

I live In Canada .
My only reason for sending you there is he has a lot of great information and am trying to keep you out of court.
Read all you can this BB has a lot of information and great inspectors who are all eager to help every one .
Click on the Bottom of this post much info there
Roy Cooke

Come on guys, Im all about reading and learning, but there is nothing you guys wish someone would have told when you were starting out?

HELLO?

Go here and read # 8 more then once .http://www.nachi.org/forum/showthread.php?t=11208
Roy Cooke

That is kind of specific to HIs right? I mean that has to do with a lot more stuff than a mold inspector.
Heres the way I figure it, and correct me if im wrong or stupid about anything.
1:Money for course $600 in home learning and testing. CMI and and CMRC certified. does it make a difference where I get certified?
2:equipment, my dad is a general home repair guy, plumbing/electrical/drywall/renovation, so I think we’ve got at least some of the tools/equipment covered.
3:reporting system, I have a computer, not sure what is exactly needed for this?
4:insurance, I have not looked into yet
5: a big portion of your “warning” is about getting customers, I may also have an advantage there too. I live in a smaller town that is growing fast, my family has lived here for a long time now. We also own a hardware store, and between the hardware store and my dad’s business we have quite a few loyal customers, we are friends with the town chief and lieutenant, and are on very good terms with a few realators, and 2 investors, who own a bunch of houses and restraunts, who have a lot of pull in this town.
6: now experiance and field work I do not have, nor do I know of any local mold inspectors in the area. BUT A good friend of mine is working with a Remediator(not sure if he inspects) in south florida that I could learn a lot from, he has been in business for years and years.

What do you think?

So even if I get certified in two weeks, I won’t be able to do inspections or remediation for 3 or 4 years? Or is it I won’t get business because I have no experiance yet?

I havn’t gone all the way into it yet, but I have put some thought into it.

Thanks for the info, everything I read is new for me, so keep it coming.

Ok, I have a question I can’t seem to find the answer to.
Lets say I get certified to inspect for mold, An old lady says she saw something on TV taling about harmful mold, and she wants her house inspected for it, just to be safe, so she hires me to do the job.

What do I do as an honest inspector?

Caoimhín P. Connell talks about tests and sample taking being rip offs, so when is it nessecary to take samples?
If I look through the entire house and SEE no signs of mold, do I then tell the client they have no mold?
When are swab samples nessecary?
When are air samples nessecary, if ever?

[quote=John D. Paronett]
Ok, I have a question I can’t seem to find the answer to.
Lets say I get certified to inspect for mold, An old lady says she saw something on TV taling about harmful mold, and she wants her house inspected for it, just to be safe, so she hires me to do the job.

What do I do as an honest inspector?

Caoimhín P. Connell talks about tests and sample taking being rip offs, so when is it nessecary to take samples?
If I look through the entire house and SEE no signs of mold, do I then tell the client they have no mold?
When are swab samples nessecary?
**When are air samples nessecary, if ever?/**quote]

That is what the training/school is for. We (HIs) aren’t trained or well enough informed to answer that. When you have completed your schooling you’ll have the answers to your questions, and a whole lot more. Good luck…

Don’t be shy about getting any kind of education…it will always come in handy. You may decide not to become a mold inspector, but the knowledge could open other avenues. Consider that 1 out 20 college graduates actually is currently employed in the field that were his college major courses (I’m one of 'em).

Once you start your studies and know a bit more about this mold thing, you will be better equipped to make any decision about it.

You might think it would be a waste to get started and realize you would rather be doing something else, but it’s better to waste several months now than to spend several years where you don’t want to be.

Go for it…and don’t ever look back. Whatever happens, however it ends up – it’s all good…

Even if you decide not to some day, that in itself is education and knowledge worth having…

What is a MICROBIAL CONSULTANT and how does this title differ from “certified mold inspector”?

It’s similar to the distinction between a “Witch Doctor” and a “Warlock”:wink:

Oh Brian…You Mold Inspector Hater…lol

Here is some good information about mold from the EPA perspective.
http://www.epa.gov/mold/moldresources.html

They even have a mold course you can take online or download the book.
http://www.epa.gov/mold/moldcourse/index.html

As mentioned, any education you can get will be valuable at some time in life.

Ralph