Incompetent inspection

I bought my house a few years and had an inspection performed. I just sold the house and my buyer’s inspector found some questionable roof patches in the attic that the buyer wants me to fix (about $1200 worth of work). I didn’t have the questionable work done during the time I lived here, so my inspector (when I bought) obviously missed this.

My buyer’s inspector says it didn’t require a lot of digging to find and that any competent inspector should have found it. Mine didn’t and now I’m stuck holding the bag. Do I have any recourse against my incompetent inspector? I’m mad as hell about this and I want my money back from my incompetent inspector.


If there was any “digging” (whatever that means) involved, I wonder if your buyer’s inspector does a visual non-invasive inspection.

At any rate, you can call your inspector and talk to him without insulting him as incompetent. What, exactly, did the report say about the roofing? Maybe there is more to the story.

Point taken Larry – I will calm down before I contact my inspector.

The roofing contractor my buyer sent over reports that there is a large sheet of plastic (about 15’x10’) laid over the insulation right below a vent that has a small leak. The plastic sheet has a few puddles of water on it and the top 5-6 inches of insulation underneath is sopping wet. Fortunately, the water hasn’t reached the ceilings of the rooms below … yet.

It still seems like something that my inspector should have caught and brought to my attention.

IMO… your public attack is uncalled for!

Did you hire the cheapest inspector you could find? You get what you pay for, as most inspectors charge what they are worth!

You didn’t? Then why are you placing the buyers inspectors opinion over the inspector you presumably researched, performed your due diligence, and eventually hired?

What exactly does “questionable roof patches in the attic” mean?

Did the roof leak while you were in possession of the home? If so, what did you do to rectify the situation?

If not… it doesn’t look like it was questionable to “your inspector” years ago.

When presented with this ‘new’ information, what were your next steps? Did you have a roofer or contractor come out to investigate and report, or you just went to the first (or three) MB’s that allowed you to publically lambast another person without facts, and began calling him out as incompetant?

What exactly is a questionable roof patch? Its either patched and dry or it’s not. WHile some work my not be the neatest or most professional, it still will service the roof system. Seeing you have been in your home for a few years, and are not having leaks, maybe the patches are doing the job.

The other inspector should not base needed repairs on things considered quesitonable. ITs either working and correct, or leaking.

In eyes of different inspectors and even contractors there may be a number of different and acceptable ways to cure/fix an issue.

As stated earlier - the bigger issue is “what exactly is the questionable patch”? It’s difficult to provide a definitive response unless more information is offered.

What exactly did the original report state about the condition?

What did the new report say?

Do you have a photo of the condition?

Conditions change yearly, what was dry then , may not be dry now.


Thank you.
I was asking what your inspector wrote in his report to you concerning the area in question. Can you quote that?

The “questionable patch” involves a placing large sheet of plastic over the attic insulation below a vent that is apparently leaking. So, instead of fixing the leak, someone just threw a sheet of plastic down to catch the water. This plastic sheet has numerous puddles on it and the top 5-6 inches of insulation underneath is completely water-logged. Fortunately, the water hasn’t reached the ceilings of the rooms below … yet, which is why I didn’t know anything about it.

Here lay another question no one is asking. The contractor stating the roof needs repairs is based on what evidence?
Is the roof leaking?

You will be hard pressed to find a roofer that does repairs without first pressing the new roof sales pitch.

How old did the vendor say the roof was?
Was this in the seller declaration?
Did the sellers declaration have the roof being patched?
How long did the home owners live there.
If they omitted the roof being patched go after the sellers!

What did the inspector have to offer in the report about the roof.
Look for limitations.

it is recommend when you hire an inspector see what they do and I recommend you allow them am image of the home so they can see what is required to mount the roof, IF THEY DO.

There is absolutely nothing in my inspection report about this situation, which is why I’m so mad about it. Seriously, someone attempts to address a roof leak by throwing a sheet of plastic down over the insulation to catch the water, without even attempting to fix the actual leak? I call that a “questionable patch job”, even if it did keep the ceiling dry for a few years. And my inspector didn’t find that?

My first impression is that you had a home inspection and your buyer had a roofer inspection.

They are not conducted under the same standard.

Just because your buyer is asking for a repair, it does not mean that it “Must” be repaired.

This has to do with your contract to purchase.
If you did not know about the leak, you are not required to disclose anything.
If it wasn’t or hadn’t rained at or prior to your home inspection, how do you expect the home inspector to find the leak? Hose down the roof? That is not in the Inspection Standards, so no.

Talk with your inspector and have him come back and talk with you about it.

Find out if your State has a Home Inspection Standard on the books. Look it over.

David did you miss this in post #3?

“The roofing contractor my buyer sent over reports that there is a large sheet of plastic (about 15’x10’) laid over the insulation right below a vent that has a small leak. The plastic sheet has a few puddles of water on it and the top 5-6 inches of insulation underneath is sopping wet. Fortunately, the water hasn’t reached the ceilings of the rooms below … yet.”

As I’ve mentioned in other replies, here’s the “questionable patch”: a vent pipe is leaking where it pokes thru the roof. Rather than fix the leak, some previous owner just threw a large sheet of plastic over the insulation below the leaking vent pipe to catch the water. They didn’t actually fix the leak at all, just laid down a piece of plastic to catch the water. There are several puddles of the sheet of plastic and the top 5-6 inches of insulation underneath are completely water-logged, but the water hasn’t reached the ceilings of the rooms below … yet. And my inspector (when I bought the house) didn’t catch this? He just poked his head thru the trap door and took a picture and declared the attic good to go. To find the sheet of plastic requires actually going all the way into the attic and to the other side of the house from where the trap door is. It can’t be seen from the trap door.

Oddly enough, this “fix” appears to have kept the water at bay all the time I lived here, so I had no idea this situation existed in my attic. But I don’t think anyone would consider this a viable “fix” for the leak at the vent pipe.

“The roofing contractor my buyer sent over reports that there is a large sheet of plastic (about 15’x10’) laid over the insulation right below a vent that has a small leak. The plastic sheet has a few puddles of water on it and the top 5-6 inches of insulation underneath is sopping wet. Fortunately, the water hasn’t reached the ceilings of the rooms below … yet.”


Is it possible that it wasn’t raining, and hadn’t for a long time, before or during the time your inspector did his attic inspection? And, is it possible that the previous owners, knowing that the vent had a leak, put the plastic up there AFTER your inspector left?
Just a thought…

My buyer’s inspector found the plastic sheeting, then the buyer’s sent over a roofing inspector to estimate what needs to be done to remedy the situation. My buyer’s inspector actually went up into the attic and looked around, whereas my inspector just poked his head thru the trap door, and declared all is well. The sheet of plastic is not visible from the trap door.

I keep hearing “roof leak” when it sounds like a cracked boot/plastic vent or cracked caulking which DOES NOT cost $1,200 to fix. Just my observation from what you’ve stated.

Are there really inspectors here that would consider a 10x12 sheet of plastic laid out in the attic to catch water unremarkable?

Amazing!

2 things: first , your inspectors liability has expired by now i’m sure , what does your signed contract state- i hope you had one
Second, any photos from your original inspection of the attic showing if plastic was even there as stated in prior post

You should of fired him when he just stuck his head up in the hatch. I would of.