Inspecting a vacant house

Originally Posted By: Todd Templeton
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Has anyone ever called the listing agent of a vacant house and asked to inspect it as if you were interested in buying it? Is this acceptable? Does it work with NACHI’s ethics? It seems like a good way to practice without a lot of pressure before doing paid inspections. You say to the agent " I might be interested, but I want to inspect it first."


Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
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Oh no. You asked an ethics question. Hang on for Farsetta! He’s probably been typing a post since he read yours. icon_wink.gif


Nick


Originally Posted By: jhagarty
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Joseph Hagarty


HouseMaster / Main Line, PA
joseph.hagarty@housemaster.com
www.householdinspector.com

Phone: 610-399-9864
Fax : 610-399-9865

HouseMaster. Home inspections. Done right.

Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
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If you have no interest in the house, you’re lying.


If you have an interest in the house, go for it. Ethically speaking, if I want to buy a house, I'm going to inspect it. I have no financial interest in it until after I inspect it.

The ethics kick in if I own it (or a part of it: "financial interest" ) and want to sell it. I shouldn't be doing an inspection for the buyer.

On the other hand, you could collaborate with the realtors, ask their permission to inspect it, promise to tell them "nothing" about what you find so the disclosure laws don't kick in, and go get your learning experience.

I think the last option, the truth, is probably the better one.


--
Erby Crofutt
B4U Close Home Inspections
Georgetown, Kentucky

www.b4uclose.com

Originally Posted By: jhagarty
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



icon_question.gif



Joseph Hagarty


HouseMaster / Main Line, PA
joseph.hagarty@housemaster.com
www.householdinspector.com

Phone: 610-399-9864
Fax : 610-399-9865

HouseMaster. Home inspections. Done right.

Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



I have to disagree with you Joe.


Using the knowledge and experience and training you have to determine which purchase you want to make based on the condition of the item is not unethical.

You do it everytime you buy a used car. It's no different if you're buying a house.

I'd be upfront about it to the seller though.

Our Code of Ethics is meant to address you deceiving your client.


--
Erby Crofutt
B4U Close Home Inspections
Georgetown, Kentucky

www.b4uclose.com

Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



From Lawyers:


Only a fool has himself for a client.


From Doctors:
Don't operate on your family.

From Home Inspectors:
Don't inspect a house your going to buy.

While I would inspect it, I'd also hire a good third party inspector just to take the emotion out of it.


--
Erby Crofutt
B4U Close Home Inspections
Georgetown, Kentucky

www.b4uclose.com

Originally Posted By: Todd Templeton
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Gentleman,


Thanks for the replies. I just meant that you inspect a vacant house for practice only. No plans to buy it or anything. The only emotion is excitement over inspecting a house. Some say practice on your friends and relatives, this may not be the easiest proposition because you're still invading their privacy to some degree.
I still think it is a great idea, but factoring in everything (calling realtors, saying you might be interested when you really are not, and finding vacant houses, etc.) it's not worth it.

Todd Templeton


Originally Posted By: slong
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Todd


I practiced on family and friend’s houses. It has it’s drawbacks though. Inspecting dad’s, grandma and such was ok. They appreciated it, but I ended having to help repair everything I found. That’s ok too, if you have the time.


The last courtesy inspection I performed taught me a lesson. It was for a friend who was purchasing a house. He didn’t pay attention to anything I said. It seemed because it was free it was not worth listening to. He even gave me a tip. I thanked him but it did not uplift me. It turned out he thought he was doing me a favor instead me helping him. I decided then that would be the last except for family that sincerely need my help. But I intend to prepare them mentally for it so they will feel confident and realize my time is valuable.


I also observed the do-it-yourselfer is reluctant thinking you might criticize his amateur work, which I don’t do but they’re on the defense anyway.


Not teaching here, simply sharing some thots.


Stewart Long


HomeSure Inc.


Originally Posted By: dvalley
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Todd,


Just inspect it.
You want to have alot of fun practicing? Wherever you are, whether it be in your relatives house, friends house or a house of a neighbor, Ask to go into the basement or crawlspace. You will need to dress appropriately for the crawl spaces because low-crawling will guarantee dirty clothes and webs all over you and in your face.
You will definately find numerous defects under the house. This is where you will find the majority of the defects throughout the inspection. There is not a basement/crawl space that is defect-free. Newer construction will have fewer defects, but they will be there. This is one area I save for last, due to the writing involved.
Basements are fun as long as you know what you are looking for. Get your flashlight and start inspecting those basements and crawls. You'll be amazed at how much there is to learn in these small classrooms. Hands-on and Self teaching is the way to go. If you have questions, we will be here for you in this forum.
Go get em' Todd. Don't be shy...Everyone has a house. ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


--
David Valley
MAB Member

Massachusetts Certified Home Inspections
http://www.masscertified.com

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go."

Originally Posted By: Dan Harrid
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



If you live in Arizona , add climbing 2 story tile roofs at 115 plus degrees , and crawling attics 130-150 degrees in fiberglass insulation for up to 30 minutes, icon_sad.gif {a great way to lose those extra pounds] if your lucky you can find a tear in the AC ductwork