Insurability inspections

Originally Posted By: janderson
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Wondering if anyone has done any insurability inspections. I was recently approached by an insurance agent friend of mine about doing some and I was wondering if anyone else has had any past experiences they would like to share.


Thanks. icon_smile.gif


Originally Posted By: mpatton
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Jeremiah,


Were you approached to look at potential rental property or a multifamily unit verses a primary residence? I recently had a conversation referring to the aforementioned rental type property specifically related to the electrical system.
icon_smile.gif


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Michael Patton
AA Home Inspection
Serving Northern KY & Greater Cincinnati OH

AA@AAHomeInspection.net
www.AAHomeInspection.net

Originally Posted By: janderson
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



This would be for a single family homeowners insurance policy. Apparently, this insurance company (State Farm) requires some of its new policy holders to have the home inspected prior to issuing a homeowners insurance policy.


Jer icon_lol.gif


Originally Posted By: mpatton
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Help us all out; see if you can get a copy of the wording that State Farm is using. icon_surprised.gif



Michael Patton


AA Home Inspection


Serving Northern KY & Greater Cincinnati OH


AA@AAHomeInspection.net
www.AAHomeInspection.net

Originally Posted By: ismetaniuk
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This membership was a big waste of my time!



Igor


Top To Bottom Inspections


Glen Spey, NY

Originally Posted By: janderson
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



I have a meeting scheduled with the insurance agent, I will check and see if I can find some sort of scope for what they are looking for in the inspection. From what the insurance agent has told me already, they are not looking for the type of detail found in a full blown buyers inspection icon_sad.gif --only things like structural defects or other items existing that may cause future damage to the structure and cause the insurance company to have to pay out some money to fix the damage.


I thought about marketing a full inspection to the homeowner and I will give that a try if and when I go out to do the insurability inspection.

Jeremiah


Originally Posted By: rray
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State Farm does the same thing here in California. I have one of their forms around here somewhere.


Many of us in California, including CREAI and, I believe, ASHI, discovered that the form they were trying to get home inspectors to complete can present a lot of legal problems. Many E&O insurance companies also don't like the forms and will not cover home inspectors who answer them.

The forms are not full-blown like a home inspection report, and therein lies the problem. I know that CREIA issued an emergency press release stating that answering the State Farm forms qualifies as a home inspection that falls below CREIA's standards of practice. Since CREIA's SOP are virtually identical to ASHI, I'm sure the form would fall below ASHI standards.

The main problem with the form they were using here is that they wanted the home inspector simply to state the "general condition" of "xxx" as "poor average good very good excellent" or some such scale. Obviously one person's definition of "good" can be quite different from another person's definition of "good."

If you have licensing in your state, also beware.


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Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.