Is anyone familure with there terms?

Originally Posted By: phughes
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The questions is from some students ???


a. Jack Legging

b. California Framing

c. Crown (as pertains to the chimney)

d. Is three phase power considered to have three poles or four?
(the information as we interpert it conflicts with the school's)


Originally Posted By: mpetner
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Hi Peter,


I can't say I'm very familiar with any of those terms, but from what I understand of them, California framing has something to do with roof construction. Any spec. language in bid reports that I've read seem to suggest the same. Try visiting this site to view a crude sketch. http://www.engsw.com/Drawings/Emde/16S53.html

Also, the only crown, as it pertains to chimneys, that I know of might be the sloped section at the top of the chimney. The crown should slope down from the flue liner to allow rainwater to drain off.

And as far as poles go, I've heard that term mostly associated alot with electric motors. I've seen some manufacturers spec out their motors that operate on 3 phase as having 4 poles. But that's not to say there can be three. I guess I'm definitely not helping out here.

Three phase power is actually 3-single phases offset by 120 degrees. I'm not familiar with a 3-phase main panel setups. Three phase power is mostly associated with heavy industry. It delivers more steady power as opposed to the pulsating nature delivered by single phase. It's kind of like comparing power from a lopey single cylinder engine versus a perfectly balanced V8.


"Jack-Legging," well, I heard that term used once or twice before meaning putting something together any old way that works.

What kind of class are you teaching?

I know I'm not much help here, but since no one else was responding, I figured I'd give it a shot.


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Peter,


It looks like no one is going to take a stab at this, so I will be the first to embarrass myself.

Please keep in mind that I have no idea of what you are talking about, so don't quote my response as gospel.

Jack Legging. I think this would pertain to the roof. Jacks are braces that help support the roofing lumber and they are usually placed half way down. Sounds to me like they just added to that terminology.

California Framing. I think this one is region specific but since I have not a clue ![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif) The only thing I could possibly think is that since California is in the earthquake zone that require special framing needs for additional support.

Crown. Commonly known as a chimney cap. Seals the top of the chimney to prevent water penetration.

Three phase. You can have a three phase, four wire or a three phase five wire. It is my understanding that you have three hot wires (3 poles) in the three phase wiring. I am not sure about the five wire since I have never encountered it. You could ask Bob Patterson since he is a licensed electrician he may know.

What school are you attending? Just seems like they should be concentrating a little more on the single phase wiring since that is the only kind you will encounter in residential inspections. It is confusing to most because the single phase is actually two hot wires, only god knows why they call it single phase.

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: jhagarty
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Joseph Hagarty


HouseMaster / Main Line, PA
joseph.hagarty@housemaster.com
www.householdinspector.com

Phone: 610-399-9864
Fax : 610-399-9865

HouseMaster. Home inspections. Done right.

Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Joe H,


Why the HE** does everyone always wait for me to embarrass myself first? It is someone else's turn to go first the next time! ![icon_biggrin.gif](upload://iKNGSw3qcRIEmXySa8gItY6Gczg.gif)

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: phughes
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I not taking the class or teaching it. These are students trying to reseach information. It is possible the questions are not stated exacly correct, and possible they ae just obscure terms used by some groups in various locations.


But they asked me, and I have my own thougths and wondered if anyone knew specifically. It never hurts us to strain our minds heck, I might learn something.

If anyone runs accross these let us know.


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Peter,


Like I said earlier in my post, I believe you have questions that are region specific. You could try asking Russel Kirk he is from California and if anyone would know he would be the place to start.

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: Rusty Rothrock
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Peter -


Some of your questions have been answered already; let me chime in on my first impressions when I read the terminology you were asking about :

Jack Legging - In Virginia at least, a Jack Legger is someone who impersonates a professional trades person. To "jack leg" means to do a half-as_ job on something. When one is referred to as a "jack-legger" means that they perform so-so work.

California Framing - I think Joe M. might be on to something here concerning earthquakes, etc. They probably have to use some special connectors (teco and simpson hangers, etc.) at various key structural elements throughout the house. I would imagine one key area being how the floor and wall framing are attached to the foundation (or slab) sill plates.

When you find out officially what California Framing means, please let us all know. Thanks.

Regards,
Rusty Rothrock
Richmond, VA


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Rusty,


In regards to jack legging. That means that someone is doing half-a$$ed work only you said it in the politically correct manner, right? ![icon_cool.gif](upload://oPnLkqdJc33Dyf2uA3TQwRkfhwd.gif)

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: Lyle Dady
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Three phase wiring. I’ll try to give this a shot.


As Joe H. and Joe M. indicated above you will find 3-phase wiring in the industrial or commercial environment.

Typically when someone is referring to 3-phase 3-wire they are talking about wiring for electrical motors. Three hot wires each phase 120 degrees out of phase with the next.

When referring to a 3-phase 4-wire system they are typically talking about a system that has a neutral derived at a transformer. The neutral can be used for lighting, and depending on transformer types and connections could also be used for 120v single phase power.

When referring to a 3-phase 5-wire system they are typically talking about a system with 3 hot wires a nutral and a ground.

This is a very simplistic description of typical 3 phase wiring.
There are many different methods of transformer connections and designs for a variety of voltages and applications.

Lyle Dady.


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Lyle,


Would that be like Delta and Wye?

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: Lyle Dady
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Yes WYE and DELTA are types of transformer connections.


Other types are STAR, WYE-DELTA etc.

The following are some of the types of primary to secondary connections.

STAR-DELTA, STAR-STAR, DELTA-DELTA for lighting and power, OPEN-DELTA for lighting and power, WYE-DELTA for power, WYE-DELTA for lighting and power. This list goes on.

Transformers are used in many ways, to step voltages up or down, to create neutrals, to allow multiple voltage taps, to balance electrical loads, filter out electrical noise and or harmonics.

This is a very basic and limited description of this subject.

Listed below are two pocket hand books I have used in the past that have been very helpful in describing transformers, electrical formulas and other electrical related issues.

UGLY'S ELECTRICAL REFERENCES By Georg V. Heart.
Burleson Distributing Corp. 3501 Oak Forest Drive.Houston, Texas 77018
800-531-1660.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING POCKET HANDBOOK.
Produced by the Electrical Apparatus Service Association (EASA)
1331 Baur Blvd.,St.Louis, Mo 63132.

Lyle Dady.


Originally Posted By: jhagarty
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icon_question.gif



Joseph Hagarty


HouseMaster / Main Line, PA
joseph.hagarty@housemaster.com
www.householdinspector.com

Phone: 610-399-9864
Fax : 610-399-9865

HouseMaster. Home inspections. Done right.

Originally Posted By: jmyers
This post was automatically imported from our archived forum.



Well now…I did not know they are used for creating neutrals. Learn something new every day! icon_biggrin.gif


Joe Myers