Localized raised shingles


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Localized raised shingles from ridge to bottom. The roof sheathing looks to be in great shape underneath from the attic, and the framing is manufacture trusses, that also appear to be in good shape. It puts me in the mind of offset trusses, but you would think you would see the same on the other side of the roof. Any options would be great to hear.

Plumb and straighten your walls, then set each truss heel to the same wall. Be sure to not rotate truss direction from one to another. Because the truss plant’s jig probably isn’t perfectly symmetrical, this would result in humps in the roof plane.

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If the roof trusses are in good shape I would say it is not an issue. However, if extreme it can cause shingles to lose adhesion and pop loose along the “humps”

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I often see that “lump” where the garage and house intersect. I can’t ever remember finding a smoking gun problem. Those look like 3-tab shingles or similar. I think similar things are present more often than we think but the newer (I’m dating myself here, I know) laminated shingles mask a lot of imperfections. 3-tabs are more smooth and you see every little imperfection.

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Racking shingles, on installation, can leave “humps”…

But, I think Scott has it.

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Interesting that the raised shingles are located at the center of the house. Were there cracks in the foundation on either side that line up with the raised shingles?

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No Sir, Everything looked good where it was viewable.

Does anyone else think the picture of the “Family Handyman” roofer is a bit odd? I’m trying to figure out why he is working that way.

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Those with kids will know that is “Blippi”

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He’s never done it before…they needed a picture. :man_shrugging:

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Are you talking about the loose tether rope with several missing components to the safety system, the face mask, or that he appears to be left handed?

Larry has it best!

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What is that device he’s holding in his left hand? And how does it connect to the air compressor machine thingy?

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I’ve always worked from side to side and bottom up, so I can easily fasten shingles without moving aside upper rows to get fasteners into shingles. Why run shingles all the way up to the ridge and then start at the eave again, carefully weaving in each row, careful not to damage shingles above?

Yes, also using a hammer will take a very long time vs a pneumatic, and the guy is actually wearing trail running ( off road) running shoes instead of roofing boots.

Where are the pictures of the area of concern from within the attic?