main drain and roots

Originally Posted By: kelliott
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I did an 80,000 house a couple weeks ago, and it seemed to go well, even tho the realtor had to push hard to get the guy to agree to an inspection.


I had a discount coupon out that he took advantage of, and he seemed quite pleased at the end.


Did a followup call today to realtor, and first words out of her mouth were, Oh, didn’t he get ahold of you? “No”. Oh, well the day they moved in the drains all backed up and the basement filled full of water. He had to have Rotorooter out the lines were full of roots. He was talking about suing that inspector, because he said you should have found that.


I had flushed all the toilets, run water down all the showers, sinks dishwasher ran thru a cycle. Nothing seemed unusually slow.

But they come in and use the toilets and right off it's plugged. And he's talking about suing me to recover his $120 drain service fee.

My report clearly states that Underground pipes are not a part of the inspection. And it clearly states it's a visual inspection. But this jerk was going to sue.

I think the realtor has calmed him down for now. But the minute something was wrong, he was going after the inspector. It wasn't the realtors fault, or the sellers fault. It was that d*m inspector.
Ain't it nice to be loved ![nachi_sarcasm.gif](upload://6HQh6KbNiD73gqTNQInjrR2zeJw.gif)


Originally Posted By: rcooke
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This happened to me .


What the usual cause is could be some roots not enough yet to cause a problem.


Before moving the original home owner has cleaned and dumped all the excess food from the fridge and suddenly the system slows down and much get caught by the roots.


Home DEPO has a product that will dissolve roots in the sewer system and it usually works well .


No way can an inspector by held responsible for the sudden excess of the drains.


My thoughts .



Roy Cooke Sr.


http://Royshomeinspection.com

Originally Posted By: bgraham
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just sold the house that I live in for 16 years never any plumbing problems(knock on wood) well the day I put the sign in the yard the washing machine over flows. Come to find out that the washer drain box plug had been knock in (instead of removed) got stuck in the last 90 before the main. 16 years no problems it just goes to show ya… icon_confused.gif


Originally Posted By: Jay Moge
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my plumber and i were chasing a 1st floor leak that ended up on the 3rd floor, along the way we found 2 nails in 2 different pvc drain pipes, one 3’’ sheet rock screw 2’’ deep in the 4’’ main cast, and one large wad of duct tap over a sheered copper 1.5’’ drain. NONE of wich were leaking, but the brand new symons single handle valve on the 3rd floor was improperly assembled and leaked like a bucket with a hole in it. ya just can’t tell. the only thing that holds true in plumbing is “hot on the left, cold on the right, and $hit don’t flow uphill” and the first 2 parts of the are negotiable. icon_cool.gif


Originally Posted By: wdecker
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I run into this alot.


Darn architects design the 4" drains and vents to be run inside walls, which are only 2 x 4 studs. The result? One heck of a vertical bulge in the drywall. Wouldn't you just know that this is the exact area the the new owner decided to crill through for a milly to hang a plant hanger.

Brown water all over the wall and in the basement (finished) ceiling below.

I think it is a shame that so many architects never swung a hammer in their lives.

'Course, the plumber and the drywall people should have caught it.


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Will Decker
Decker Home Services
Skokie, IL 60076
wjd@DeckerHomeServices.com

Originally Posted By: ccoombs
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Keith


I would suggest you contact the new home owner, remind him that the issue is outside the scope of your work and offer to pay the $120 as a good will jester. And part of you paying the $120 fee is they waive any right to sue over any other issue....even if it is a legitimate claim. In my opinion that is the cheapest insurance you could every buy. If they don't accept your payment it can still be a customer service success.


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Curtis