New Article: Inspecting Aluminum Wiring During a Home Inspection

Enjoy reading this new inspection article, “Inspecting Aluminum Wiring During a Home Inspection.”

inspecting aluminum wiring during home inspection internachi

Special thanks to InterNACHI® members Lon Henderson, Jim Milby, Robert Meier, Kevin Leonard, Brian Cawhern, Eli Klugmann, Neil DeGaris, Kenton Shepard, and everyone who contributed to the article. If you would like to make recommendations to improve this article, please email Ben Gromicko at ben@internachi.org.

3 Likes

Big thanks to InterNACHI’s Lon Henderson, Jim Milby, Robert Meier, Kevin Leonard, Brian Cawhern, Eli Klugmann, Neil DeGaris, Kenton Shepard, et al. “You/re The Best!”

Thankful for this article. What I like the most is how at the end you clearly state that single-strand aluminum repairs must also be made at terminations inside the service panels and subpanels. This has been a hot-button item of mine for a while, and I’ve run into plenty of push-backs from both electricians and other inspectors about this over the years. The common refrain is that “Those breakers say CU/AL, so they’re intended for aluminum.” To which I reply, “Yes, but so are the switches and outlets, and we’re repairing those, so what’s the difference?” The CPSC even says to do it to terminations inside the panels.

In a nutshell, from what I understand when repairs happen to single-strand aluminum, EVERY termination/connection must be repaired with approved materials and techniques. Period.

1 Like

Although it is somewhat trivial I would appreciate it if someone could correct the spelling of my name at the end of that article.

6 Likes

Yes, every termination point of single strand aluminum wiring requires a alumiconn connector.
Florida insurance underwriters will not accept coverage without them. Usually anywhere from 75 to 150 connectors maybe need for every outlet, switch and light fixture in a house, depending upon the size.
Cost could range from $1,000 upward depending house size done by a Fl state licensed electrician.
Houses built in the 70’s are most frequent.

2 Likes

Richard, do you know your website like this?:

http://www.richardpickle.com

1 Like