New Exam released August 9 requires you to re-register.

Originally Posted By: gromicko
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If you have previously registered and taken NACHI’s Online Inspector Examination (older version), you will need to re-register at http://exams.nachi.org/signup.php to take the new version.


The new version recently released has many improvements over the old version including interactive self evaluation. You can read more about the new NACHI's Online Inspector Examination at http://www.nachi.org/aboutexam.htm

Some people were complaining that their old username and password didnt' work. You must re-register for the new exam at http://exams.nachi.org/signup.php

Of course the new version is also free and open to all. You need not be a member.

Nick


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Now he tells me. I tried for an hour to get it to take my user name and password, finally having it sent to me by email. Only to find out it did not work and I re-registered.


BTW...I got a 89. I just can not seem to move above that mark. The worse part is the slower I go, the worse my score. GO FIGURE!

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: rray
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It’s just like those college tests, Joe, go with your gut instincts. The more you think, the more you get wrong. You do remember college tests, don’t you Joe?



Home inspections. . . .


One home at a time.


Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
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Well, I tried the new exam. Much better.


I still think some of the questions have to many ridiculous answers with only one seemingly right answer.

i.e. Water pressure tanks have:
Bladder
Arms
Legs
Mouth.

Perhaps at least two plausible answers per question.

In addition, the chance to review each question and edit your answer is really nice.

Of course, I was to egotistical to use it. Then, in reviewing couple of questions I print screened to look at in more depth, realized I had checked the wrong answer on one of them. Duh!

Do we really want dialectric in the mechanical mercury thermostat question or was it intended to be dielectric?

Do we really want width in the stair tread "width vs run so that it noses" question, or was it intended to be "Depth".

The pie charts and study suggestions are helpful for those who miss a bunch of questions, but the percentage calculations really don't mean much if you only miss a few questions. Perhaps adding the actual number of questions in each area?

Overall, I think it is a much improved testing source since the last time I took it months & months ago.

I saw that 10 other people were taking the test at the same time I was.

How does the fact of those who start the test and stop in the middle (they realize it must be a dumb test because they don't know the answers) effect the overall Pass/Fail statistics.


--
Erby Crofutt
B4U Close Home Inspections
Georgetown, Kentucky

www.b4uclose.com

Originally Posted By: Richard Stanley
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I took the test again - 89- 28 minutes. If you know the answers to questions, they are all easy. If not --. I think that a test should be used as a learning tool as well as a membership qualification. Therefore, I believe that the test participant should be exposed to the missed questions and correct answers. I missed 13 of 120, but I do not have a clue which 13 they were. I think that the intent of this organization should be to develop the best possible inspectors so that they can excel in their chosen vocation and pay dues, etc. and promote the industry. That is the best way to enhance the reputation and image of the association and in so doing, increase the volume and quality of the membership. I don’t believe that by providing the missed questions and answers that you will dilute the test. What are the odds of getting a duplicate test? There is a large pool of questions. Keep adding the questions. Make ‘NACHI’ synonymous with quality.


Originally Posted By: rray
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A post on a different thread seems to indicate that Richard is pro-texas university. In spite of that, I agree with his post above. icon_eek.gif



Home inspections. . . .


One home at a time.


Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
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This one was not meant to be funny. There are arms on many mechanical devices. A drip leg on gas water tanks. A mouth on a faucet. Etc.


Thanks a bunch guys.

Nick


Originally Posted By: rray
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Nick Gromicko wrote:
I don't know what you mean by run vs. depth question. Help me on that.


The stairs are typically referred to as having a certain "rise and run." I would equate "run" and "depth" as being the same thing. Rise is vertical and run is horizontal. This is in reference to motion up and down the stairs. Run does not refer to the width of the steps.

I think minimum rise is 7? inches and minimum run is 9? inches. There are probably some other factors involved, since we always find single steps with a much smaller rise. Probably relates to having three or more steps. Help me on this one guys and gals.


--
Home inspections. . . .
One home at a time.

Originally Posted By: Chris Morrell
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Many people have requested that the questions that they answered incorrectly be given to them. With the new “what needs work” system at the end of the exam, I personally feel that this would not help the inspector, but rather hinder them. If they missed X% of the Topic X questions, I’d much rather see them brush up on all of Topic X until they no longer have trouble with that subject rather than learn the answers to specific questions. The end reporting system will be even further revamped over time to provide more accurate reports of where the examinee needs improvement. I think that this is the best way to go.



Chris Morrell


Director of Information Technology


http://www.nachi.org/


![](upload://iqt1iV7owUpGP2DUasmQoeM7vFl.html)

Originally Posted By: gbeaumont
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Hi Chris, whilst like many others I have previously wished to see which questions that I got wrong I also belive that it is generally counter productive as all it would do is enable a member to get 100% on our exam, it would do nothing to generally educate inspectors, I like the reporting system as you have built it on the back end of the exam, and no doubt as you get time to develope it further it will become more & more useful.


Gerry


--
Gerry Beaumont
NACHI Education Committee
e-mail : education@nachi.org
NACHI phone 484-429-5466

Inspection Depot Education
gbeaumont@inspectiondepot.com

"Education is a journey, not a destination"

Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
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The rise on the step is the height difference from 1 step to the next. i.e. how high do you have to lift your foot to move it from one step to the next. Typically about 7 1/2 inches.


The run or depth is front to back. If your foot is on the step (in a normal stair climbing position) , it's the distance from the edge of the step closest to your toe to the edge of the step closest to your heel. Typically about 10 or 11 inches.

The width of the step is the distance from the wall? side to the railing? side. Normally about 30 - 36 inches.


--
Erby Crofutt
B4U Close Home Inspections
Georgetown, Kentucky

www.b4uclose.com

Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
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Erby,


Dielectric misspelling and depth/width items both corrected.

Thank you.

Perhaps at most, we could tag just certain safety questions such that if an examinee answers incorrectly, the examinee automatically get a bunch of helpful information on that subject, at the end of the exam.

This would provide another layer of education of examinees where it is most needed to protect consumers.

If after reading and studying this information, the examinee is able to take the exam again and answer those questions correctly... it would be because the examinee learned something... and so the examinee would be deserving of a higher score.

Nick


Originally Posted By: Richard Stanley
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Sounds like Gerry and Chris are worried about people getting 100 on the test. I say the more the better. The homebuyer is in better hands. I also think Nick understands the learning factor in testing. I took a course @ Exterior Design Institute on line. When I finished the tests, it immediately showed me the whole test including the wrong answers. That one did not provide the correct answers, but, at least I could track down the info to correct myself. The ultimate test is on the job where we are tested everyday. Except for Pa. inspectors, most of the participants on this board are already in the business. I think just showing a general area of weakness is good for the 5th grade, but not in this group. Well, maybe…


Originally Posted By: rray
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I just want to know which questions I got wrong so that I can study the subject. I don’t care what the correct answer was on the test at that point.



Home inspections. . . .


One home at a time.


Originally Posted By: Mike Nelson
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I recently took the new test. 19% of my wrong answers were in the General category. What particular subjects are in this category that would not fall into the other categories( Safety, Roofing, Plumbing, etc.)


Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
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Some questions do not neatly fall into any sub-category and so are “general.” Other questions fall into more than one category: most often electrical and safety, and so get categorized in both (example: A missing breaker exposing the live bus bar at the electric panel…)


I'm working on the math/system behind the introduction of new questions. We currently have questions weighed 0 thru 7. We reserve 7 for those questions that every actively practicing home inspector should be able to answer. New questions will be initially weighted zero and then climb to where they should be weighted only after enough people answer it to get decent data on it. In other words we don't want to punish examinees for randomly getting new, untested questions, but we still need them to answer them to get data.

I'll funnel new questions into this testing system and compare them against existing data. I am looking for new questions to test. Email me nick.gromicko@nachi.org if you have any to submit.

Nick


Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
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Also, though individual question pass/fail rates appear as you take the exam, weights do not. Since new questions added to the pool will initially be weighted zero, the weight of each question should not appear to examinee during the exam. Since examinees don’t know what the weights of each quesion are, they will likely to try to answer all questions.


Nick


Originally Posted By: Richard Stanley
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Most of us are phi’s (poor home inspectors), not phd’s. How about this math system? 1 correct answer = 1 point. End of test - total points = score. KISS. (no, I’m not calling you stupid) However, it’s your show.


Originally Posted By: rray
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I must admit that I am in Richard’s corner on this one. I really like 1 right answer equals 1 point. I’ve never been a big fan of weighting anything on tests.



Home inspections. . . .


One home at a time.


Originally Posted By: Richard Stanley
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Russel, I’m not used to people agreeing with me. I’m leary. You must want something. What is it??? Thanks anyway.