Number 2 S.N.A.F.U. !

Originally Posted By: bnelson
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Second inspection today went brilliantly. No spectators, just me and a brand new duplex overlooking the bay, 68 degrees F and not a cloud in the sky. Too perfect, I was beginning to think, as I hoisted myself up onto the 10/12 roof three stories up. Whoa. Dormers here and there, odd angles there and here – I was climbing around like a monkey, staring in the neighbors windows (inadvertently, of course.) Then I had to make a long stretching move to get to a lower roof level… probably 5.10b in the rock-climbing realms. When “rrrrriiippp!” Crotch seam went a good 12 inches! Hey, it got mighty drafty in there! Holy Moly, those neighbors are laughing!!!


I made my way tight-legged back toward the ladder, down onto terra firma, then into my (remembered) coveralls for the remainder.


Lesson learned: Always have a change of clothes in the kit! And look into spandex!


Shameless,
Brandon


Originally Posted By: rmoore
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LOL Brandon.


I hope you are charging enough to cover your clothing and cleaning expenses. 10:12 3 stories up? That's pushing my comfort envelope. I had a very pleasant 6:12 1913 bungalow. What a great day for sunning yourself on a roof in the Great Northwest. ![icon_biggrin.gif](upload://iKNGSw3qcRIEmXySa8gItY6Gczg.gif)


--
Richard Moore
Rest Assured Inspection Services
Seattle, WA
www.rainspect.com

Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Brandon,


With a 10/12 pitch, you are pretty lucky the only thing you ripped was your trousers. ![icon_biggrin.gif](upload://iKNGSw3qcRIEmXySa8gItY6Gczg.gif)

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: rsummers
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Brandon you must be part spider I wont get on a 10/12 with out toe boards or a roof harness set up across the ridge. I charge extra if I have to do that and most people are ok with the eave for a pitch like that. 30’ in the air How did you get up there you must have 1 big ladder .


Originally Posted By: bnelson
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The trick to getting on such a tall building is to make sure its built on a near vertical lot, like this one was. I used my 12-footer off grade at the rear, then hoisted the ladder up to the low-slope section, then up the ladder onto the steeps. I was all-fours to the ridge before I realized just how steep this thing was. I was definitely second-guessing the whole deal about the time my trousers went, and you’re right: I was lucky on that one.


Originally Posted By: dbowers
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Brandon -


I built houses for 8 years and have been inspecting for a total of 26 years (20 full time & 6 part time). Most roofers won't typically go up a 10/12 without harness or toe blocks. As far as dragging another ladder up there to straddle dormers or gables or even placed on a slope to go up more is the quickest way to give your competition a lot of business I can think of.

Over the past 4 years I've known 5 inspectors that fell or slid off roofs or the ladder slipped on them. One died; one broke his back and spent almost a year in a full body cast and later traction; one broke a leg in 9 places and is still on a walker 16 months later and 3 surgeries later; one broke his pelvis and spent 6 months in a partial body cast. One was lucky and other loosing a few teeth, he landed on bushes and was OK.

Just food for thought.

Dan Bowers (Kansas City)


Originally Posted By: dfrend
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If a roofer (or anyone) else goes on a 10/12 roof without fall protection, they better make sure OSHA is nowhere near. Fall protection is a requirement.



Daniel R Frend


www.nachifoundation.org


The Home Inspector Store


www.homeinspectorstore.com