Ok for soil contact?

Originally Posted By: thejnicki
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http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/H/HPIM0959.JPG ]


Originally Posted By: jpope
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It looks like SE or possibly USE.


In any event, it is required to be protected from damage.


--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: thejnicki
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Jeff, the cable was just strung out under the crawlspace…This is near a marsh so theres always a lot of moisture if not standing water under these houses.


Originally Posted By: jpope
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Through the crawl space it would be required to be properly secured (much like you would expect to see NM/Romex secured).


Where it exits the crawl, it should be protected by conduit and/or burial.

The type of cable is important to know. It must be listed for "wet locations" if it is buried.


--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: Thomas Ogryski
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I can see in the photo that there is printing on the jacket. If you could find a place where it is legible (such as back in the crawlspace), you would find out what type of cable it really is. If it is SE, SER, or UF, then it would be suitable for wet locations. If it is NM or NM-B, then it is OK in the crawl space, but not outside in a wet location.


However, once a cable exits the house, it is no longer allowed as a wiring method for a spa or hot tub. Also, if that cable is aluminum, it is not allowed because the required equipment grounding conductor must be copper (and it must be insulated).

Permitted wiring methods outdoors for a spa are rigid metal conduit, intermediate metal conduit, rigid non-metallic conduit, Type MC cable listed for the location, and where a flexible connection is necessary, liquidtight flexible metal or nonmetallic conduit.

Tom


Originally Posted By: Thomas Ogryski
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Aaron,


No reason why not, the sections you cited do allow for cord & plug connections & this would be much easier than installing the required wiring methods in many cases. I've got to admit though, that I have never seen a spa that requires a 50 amp circuit that was plugged in. Maybe no one could find a bubble cover for the receptacle ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


Originally Posted By: gporter
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James you keep me laughing. icon_lol.gif



Gary Porter


GLP’s Home and Mold Inspections LLC


Orlando, Fl 32828


321-239-0621


www.homeandmoldinspections.com

Originally Posted By: jpope
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NM is NOT listed for wet locations. . .


--
Jeff Pope
JPI Home Inspection Service
"At JPI, we'll help you look better"
(661) 212-0738

Originally Posted By: Aron Jacobs
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400.8 Uses Not Permitted.


Unless specifically permitted in 400.7, flexible cords and cables shall not be used for the following:


(1) As a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure


(2) Where run through holes in walls, structural ceilings, suspended ceilings, dropped ceilings, or floors


(3) Where run through doorways, windows, or similar openings


680.42 Outdoor Installations.
A spa or hot tub installed outdoors shall comply with the provisions of Parts I and II of this article, except as permitted in 680.42(A) and 680.42(B), that would otherwise apply to pools installed outdoors.
(A) (2) Cord-and-Plug Connections. Cord-and-plug connections with a cord not longer than 4.6 m (15 ft) shall be permitted where protected by a ground-fault circuit interrupter.

680.21 Motors.
(A) Wiring Methods.
(1) General. The branch circuits for pool-associated motors shall be installed in rigid metal conduit, intermediate metal conduit, rigid nonmetallic conduit, or Type MC cable listed for the location.

680.25 Feeders.
These provisions shall apply to any feeder on the supply side of panelboards supplying branch circuits for pool equipment covered in Part II of this article and on the load side of the service equipment or the source of a separately derived system.
(A) Wiring Methods. Feeders shall be installed in rigid metal conduit, intermediate metal conduit, liquidtight, flexible nonmetallic conduit, or rigid nonmetallic conduit.
![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


--
Aron Jacobs
Electrical Contractor
Electrical Instructor
North Carolina

Originally Posted By: thejnicki
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I tried to look closely but the amount of dirt that had collected mad the writing not legible… Thanks Jeff…


Originally Posted By: Aron Jacobs
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No matter what is on the sheath of the cable 400.8 forbids the cable to come from the inside to the outside.


The rules are found in part two of 680


Quote:
This cable ran from the sub panel to an outside spa,


If the cord came with the tub then I see nothing wrong with it lying on the ground as it would be expected to do so as outlined in 680.42 for the cord and plug connect outside tub as long as the receptacle is on the outside.
![icon_smile.gif](upload://b6iczyK1ETUUqRUc4PAkX83GF2O.gif)


--
Aron Jacobs
Electrical Contractor
Electrical Instructor
North Carolina

Originally Posted By: thejnicki
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Thanks Aron, much appreciated advice…