Outlet built on uncovered incandescent light

Originally Posted By: rwashington
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Saw an electric cord for the microwave fed through the sheetrock plugged into an outlet that was part of the incandescent light that served the pantry. Home built in 74. Besides the uncovered incandescent light issue is this type of light fixture still proper?



Richard W Washington


www.rwhomeinspections.com

Originally Posted By: rpalac
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That light fixture is called a “RUSSEL”. That is the common name in the industry.


The question is how many amps does that microwave feed and how long is the extention cord and is it intended for permanent or temporary use?

My guess is when you find the articles in NEC you will say "NO WAY".

If not read them again.

Bob P.
(don't have my books to help with section quotes.


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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rwashington wrote:
Saw an electric cord for the microwave fed through the sheetrock plugged into an outlet


Nothing more need be said.

The microwave needs to have another receptacle added for it because the cord is not allowed to go through the wall. Regardless of what it is plugged into.

Bob P.,

A "Russell"? Never heard that term before.


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: Charles Palmieri
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Cords through partitions is a no, no



400.8 Uses Not Permitted.
Unless specifically permitted in 400.7, flexible cords and cables shall not be used for the following:
(1) As a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure
(2) Where run through holes in walls, structural ceilings, suspended ceilings, dropped ceilings, or floors
(3) Where run through doorways, windows, or similar openings
(4) Where attached to building surfaces


Originally Posted By: rpalac
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An old term that I learned in the 60’s. They were porcilian bases primarily used in crawlspaces, closets, basements, and utility areas. You can actualy buy a cage to attach to them for closets today.


Thhe russel light fixture is a cheap way to provide light. I t might be a term here in Philly. The guys in the union all know the name but travelers from outside our area don't call it that.

Another example is a 4 x 4 or 1900 box or 4 inch square box. Simply put they all mean the same thing but different terms used in difeerent areas for a 4" square x 1-5/8" deep junction box. 1900 refers to the sq. in. or stock number ...i don't remeber (2100 box is 4-11/16 x 1-5/8" JB or junction box)


Originally Posted By: dedwards
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http://www.nachi.org/bbsystem/usrimages/more/plug%20for%20dishwasher.jpg ]


Thought you might find this one interesting while you are discussing odd wiring (or as I like to say "creative wiring"). This was the plug for the dishwasher. This was only one of numerous creative discrepancies on one home.


Originally Posted By: Charles Palmieri
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All looks like a fire hazard to me!!!