PB or not?

(Allan Youberg) #1

These bathroom water lines are on a home built in 1993. “PB2110” is always a smoking gun, but I do not see that on these lines. I do see “QEST” and Googling that suggests they MIGHT be polybutylene, but I can find nothing definitive. Can anyone verify this one way or the other? Thanks.

(Marc A. Goldenberg, Inspector Lic # HI1365 Mold Assessor Lic #1) #2

It’s PB.
Most PB pipes were marketed under the name Qest. :slight_smile:

(Larry Kage, CMI) #3

Yep, Marc’s got it. :slight_smile:

(Allan Youberg) #4

TUVM!

(Jeffrey R. Jonas) #5

Even so… that would be an assumption!
IMO, his proper course of action for his report would be to state that it is only visibly marked with a PB manufacturers trade name logo, it may be but is inconclusively PB, and that a qualified and licensed plumber experienced with PB should make a full evaluation of the entire plumbing system to identify/determine if PB exists in the home, and if any components are in need of repair/replacement.

(Jeffrey R. Jonas) #6

Even so… that would be an assumption!
IMO, his proper course of action for his report would be to state that it is only marked with the manufacturers trade name logo, it may be but is inconclusively PB, and that a qualified and licensed plumber experienced with PB should make a full evaluation of the entire plumbing system to identify/determine if PB exists, and if any components are in need of repair/replacement.

Note: It is “industry accepted” that short sink risers made of PB are non-issues and are sold and installed to this very day.

(Bradley K. Toye, CMI) #7

I agree, not much of an issue with these, except age, and insurance companies are mandating replacement in FL. They were taken off shelves and no longer manufactured many years ago. The lighter grey risers are now PEX.

(Marc A. Goldenberg, Inspector Lic # HI1365 Mold Assessor Lic #1) #8

u as usual are full of it

(Marc A. Goldenberg, Inspector Lic # HI1365 Mold Assessor Lic #1) #9

u as usual are full of it

(Jeffrey R. Jonas) #10

Wow… being a part of the Awards Committee has really turned you into a d*ck. Very sad. :sad:

(Jeffrey R. Jonas) #11

Prove me wrong.

(Marcel R. Cyr, CMI) #12

Quest (polybutylene) water pipes are made of plastic resin and were commonly used in water supply lines in homes from 1978 to as recently as 1995. However, the inner walls of the pipe flake and become brittle, possibly as a result of oxidants in the water.

I would highly recommend that it be replaced. There is always the possibility that the pipe fails between the fixture and the valve.

(Robert Young) #13

Good post about PB supply risers, Marcel.
1/4" CTS X 3/8" O.D. .062. QEST POLYBUTYLENE HOOK-UP TUBE.
Typically the tubing ruptures. Brass compression rings bite into the PB. Fittings become loose and leak.
I recommend replacement with rubber tubing wrapped with stainless braid to retain rupturers.

(Larry Kage, CMI) #14

Allan, can you post a picture of the valve connecting the supply riser to the fixture?

(Erik Schmidt) #15

A lot of fuss about a two dollar item that anyone without special skills can easily replace. What type of supply lines were they connected to?

(Robert Young) #16

It is a great exercise to tract down materials for members, Eric.

A: Actually to repair a building after a flood cost more than 2 dollars. B: As well, it becomes a blemish on your insurance record.

Hope that helps.