Please answer these questions for this researcher if you can.

Hi, Nick.

Thanks for returning my call and for giving me the opportunity to survey your members.

The purpose of the survey is to learn what building inspectors who test for moisture and mold want in a moisture meter. This information will be used by a moisture meter manufacturer to improve its product line for building inspectors and to install more useful features on their meters.

Questions:

  1.  If you’re happy with the meter you’re presently using – why? What features do you like best about it?
    
  2.  What features don’t you like . . . features that might be cumbersome, hard to use, or that could be improved upon?  
    
  3.  What additional features would you like to see, not presently on your meter, that would make it easier to operate, more effective, more reliable, or more complete?
    
  4.  Regarding mold, would you like your meter to have an alarm go off when the moisture content reaches the mold danger zone?
    
  5.  Does your meter have a setting for concrete? Drywall? Tile?  If not, would those settings be helpful?
    
  6.  Do you prefer a pin-type meter or a pinless meter? Why?
    
  7.  What’s the brand name of the moisture meter you currently use?
    
  8.  If a company offered you a Moisture/Mold Detection Kit containing devices specifically designed to detect moisture and mold, what would you like to see in it? (Some examples: moisture meter, infrared camera, air flow monitor, a VOC test unit)
    

I look forward to hearing what your members have to say.

With all best wishes,

Joe Lilli
joe@joelillicopywriting.com
210-561-7772

  1. I want a moisture meter attachment that makes it easy to attach to a painters pole. I hate bringing ladders into attics.

  2. No and that would be helpful.

Whats this danger zone discussion? Is this Kevin Wood in secret?

The surveymaster hands down is the best.
but if you could make one that size that did both probe and surface scans, have built in temp and humidity readings (like the general moisture meter does) and is calibrated for both wood, drywall and block (like my tremex) then you would have the most awsome meter around.

all for under 400 bucks also. :slight_smile:
btw calling it the mold danger zone sound silly imo.

And what it this “danger zone”? Guess I haven’t taken that class yet.

  1. If you’re happy with the meter you’re presently using – why? What features do you like best about it?
    -small fits in my tool belt, durable, simple to use

  2. What features don’t you like . . . features that might be cumbersome, hard to use, or that could be improved upon?
    -works fine

  3. What additional features would you like to see, not presently on your meter, that would make it easier to operate, more effective, more reliable, or more complete?
    -like juan said, pole attachment or even a threraded hole at the base, we could make our own attachment

  4. Regarding mold, would you like your meter to have an alarm go off when the moisture content reaches the mold danger zone?
    -mine beeps, the “mold zone” not sure on that item

  5. Does your meter have a setting for concrete? Drywall? Tile? If not, would those settings be helpful?

  6. Do you prefer a pin-type meter or a pinless meter? Why?
    -I like having both options ready, pins for unfinished areas, pinless for finished areas

  7. What’s the brand name of the moisture meter you currently use?
    -I love it, the GE Surveymaster

  8. If a company offered you a Moisture/Mold Detection Kit containing devices specifically designed to detect moisture and mold, what would you like to see in it? (Some examples: moisture meter, infrared camera, air flow monitor, a VOC test unit)
    -id think a mold test and moisture meter would be separate items. I know moisture makes mold growth easy, but not sure

I look forward to hearing what your members have to say.

With all best wishes,

Joe Lilli
joe@joelillicopywriting.com
210-561-7772
[/QUOTE]

3- I would like a cap (pin cover) that stays on. Maybe a tether attaching the cap to the meter when in use. Too many lost caps :frowning:

Camera Lens Cap Tether…

Better go back to School Sean.

4 - What do you consider a danger zone?

5 - How would a meter detect suspected moisture in tile unless the moisture is beaded on top of it.

It is not possible to determine a danger zone without having the outside temperature during an inspection. You also need to know the wall assemmbly you are dealing with. Each wall represents a challenge to find out where the dewpoint will occur.
This is known as Building Science.
Good night!
BTW I prefer delmhorst.

Call me silly but wish there was a pin type that pushes through the damn wood.
Invent self drilling pins.

Or how about a way to pound them in without killing the casing.

:roll:

Bwhahaha :smiley:

You are really good with rolling eyes Jp. LOL

Try one of these Bob…:wink:

hammer_probe.jpg

There is another way but I sure would not want to give away my trade secret to those that can see through walls. LOL

‘Highway to the Danger Zone’

What a dumb song

I am a generalist home inspector I like my tools cheap & durable.

General Tools & Instruments LCD Moisture Meter

I have about a dozen differnt kinds and I think it blows that I get widely varing results from each of them. one of them is a flir that came with my TI camera and costs like 800 bucks new. I have very little faith in any of them.

I pretty much just use them for comparison .

me too. About the only time im comfortable with results is when a stain comes back with a very low number on several. when the moisture is high, the results tend to be all over the place.