QOD for 07/14/04 (Structure)

Originally Posted By: roconnor
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Here is a pretty sticky sheathing question … put your thinking cap on … icon_wink.gif



Robert O’Connor, PE


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I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong

Originally Posted By: lwilliams
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Looks like we have a good question, the answers are all over the board! Great job Robert


Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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Sorry to say, but I don’t understand the question.



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Originally Posted By: roconnor
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If you look at the front of a garage the majority of the wall will be the opening for the vehicle door. On each side of the wall opening will be a narrow section of wall, and the question relates to the minimum width of that wall section. The requirement is often missed by designers and builders.



Robert O’Connor, PE


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I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong

Originally Posted By: tallen
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I want to change my answer!! icon_lol.gif



I have put the past behind me,


where , however, it now sits, making rude remarks.


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30 Oct 2003-- 29 Nov2005

Originally Posted By: kmcmahon
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Thanks, now I understand your question. I don’t know the answer, but I understand the question! icon_redface.gif



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Originally Posted By: Ryan Jackson
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roconnor wrote:
The requirement is often missed by designers and builders.


Thats an understatement.


--
Ryan Jackson, Salt Lake City

Originally Posted By: roconnor
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Using the IRC as a guide, a 48" wide panel would be required without any special connections. With some additional nailing along blocked panel edges and additional anchor bolts at the panel, that width can be reduced to 2'-8" (covered by IRC R602.10.4 and R602.10.6).

Some manufacturers make special reinforced panels (e.g. Simpson "Strong-Brace Wall" panel) that can be used to reduce the width down to like 16" to 18", but thats a special "alternate design" not covered by the model codes ... CLICK HERE FOR AN EXAMPLE


--
Robert O'Connor, PE
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I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong

Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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Stupid DSL caused a double post icon_mad.gif


Originally Posted By: Blaine Wiley
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Wow! I have yet to see one that is 48"!


Originally Posted By: Ryan Jackson
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bwiley wrote:
Wow! I have yet to see one that is 48"!


That is why 99% of them have hold downs on them, making them an "alternate braced wall panel".


Edited to correct spelling


--
Ryan Jackson, Salt Lake City

Originally Posted By: Guest
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Additional braces don’t make up for loss of shear strength. There was an excellent article in JLC …it’s in the archcives for anyone interested.


Originally Posted By: roconnor
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Chad Fabry wrote:
Additional braces don't make up for loss of shear strength.

Do ya have a link to the article Chad. Not sure what your trying to say, but the purpose of bracing is to increase the shear strength of a structure. If your are talking about the straps around the special shear panels, they increase the shear strength by increasing the connection capacity ... usually the weak link on a shear panel.


--
Robert O'Connor, PE
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I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong

Originally Posted By: Guest
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I’ll look today, I read it in the magazine, but I have the online subscription too. The problem with the online subscription is it’s hard to take it to the bathroom.


Originally Posted By: ssopha
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I read my online JLC on lap top.


Here are 2 links.

http://www.jlconline.com/cgi-bin/jlconline.storefront/40f7cc120024e5eb27177f00000105d2/Product/View/0404buil

http://www.apawood.org/level_b.cfm?content=app_bas_wallbracing


Originally Posted By: Guest
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I just re-read Ryan’s post. I thought he felt that additional hold downs were required on narrow shear panels and only that. I see now that he also included bracing. Honestly, I misunderstood his post.


The JLC article is good enough to pay for if you don’t have a subscription.


Originally Posted By: roconnor
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That sounds like a good JLC article for any HI’s doing phased construction inspections … icon_lol.gif



Robert O’Connor, PE


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NACHI Education Committee


I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong