Retrotec Blower Door & Duct Blaster with Free BPI / LEED training

We are currently working on an alliance with the largest LEED training facility in the country. They just introduced their BPI Building Analyst Professional training last week.

We wanted to start this alliance off on a good foot so we are offering free BPI and LEED training with the purchase of our entry level BPI energy auditing package which includes; Retrotec Q46 blower door system, Retrotec Q32 duct blaster, Testo 327-2 o2 & Co2 combustion analyzer for $7,581.25

BPI training including field audit and testing retail price is $1500.00
LEED commercial or residential certification training retail is $595. (add the other for $595)

Other misc meters or devices can be added to this package at the package discount rate, including infrared and level I certification. Call or email for details.

Jason Kaylor – JJ
VP of Specialty Products
877/207-1244
AC Tool Supply](http://www.aikencolon.com/)
Fluke Thermal Imagers
Testo 880 Infrared Cameras
Fluke TiR4 Thermal Imager
Fluke TiR 1 Resources](http://www.fluketir1.com/)
Fluke Ti55 Infrared Camera](http://www.fluketi55.com/)
Retrotec Duct & Blower Door](http://www.retrotecblowerdoor.com/)
Energy Audit Talk](http://www.energyauditortalk.org/)

What is the total price and other cost?

Doh forgot to put that in. Just edited it, thanks John.

Jason Kaylor – JJ
VP of Specialty Products
877/207-1244
AC Tool Supply](http://www.aikencolon.com/)
Fluke Thermal Imagers
Testo 880 Infrared Cameras
Fluke TiR4 Thermal Imager
Fluke TiR 1 Resources](http://www.fluketir1.com/)
Fluke Ti55 Infrared Camera](http://www.fluketi55.com/)
Retrotec Duct & Blower Door](http://www.retrotecblowerdoor.com/)
Energy Audit Talk](http://www.energyauditortalk.org/)

Have IR; Have Level I Certification; have CO2 Analyzer, etc.

How much for Blower Door Kit / BPI Training / Cert / Etc

Dan, I did a lot of checking around and got my BPI training for $875.00 and with that certificate the blower door was $2400.00. No need to spend big bucks when you just getting into energy audits. The blower door is a minneapolis and it has a conversion for CMF, or “can’t meet fifty” meaning fifty pascals.
My opinion is if you can’t get to fifty then you make recommendations and do more testing until you get it right. Look around before you jump in, but from what I understand classes are hard to get into right now.

Tell us where you got your stuff. Sounds like some good prices.

Peter did his BPI out here in Phoenix, and yeah it is $875. Vinny out here is a great guy. It is a 3 day course. Peter is also correct with the back up. Currently the BPI out here is backed up 2 months, and probably 3 very soon. Not to mention if you live in AZ and go to the AZ BPI facility you get 1/2 of the cost of the training reimbursed through APS. The BPI training in Phoenix is the cheapest I know of. Most are from $1250 to $1990.

There is no smoke and mirrors with this deal. We simply pay for the training at retail price. We use two training facilities. The BPI / Resnet / Hers is Saturn Online. For their complete training including the hands on, tests, blower door / duct blaster training it is $2000. The BPI / LEED training facility we use is Clean Edison. It is $1500 and $595 for LEED. The LEED is commercial or residential only. Meaning if you want the other half it is $595.

Peter is also correct with the 50 pascals rating. You really need to get to it, but if you cannot you can use a conversion chart. Personally I would rather use a better door and just get to it. The other issue with the Minneapolis door is, 2500 sq ft and you about done. The Q46 and Q4E retrotec doors are expandable with up to 2 additional fans. And you do not need a laptop to run them. The DM-2A guages are computers within them selves. Another benefit to being able to add more fans is the ability to do split tests. In a commercial environment you could pressurize the drop ceiling and negative pressure the main area. With 3 fans you could pressurize both an attic and basement while pressurizing the main structure.

Technically if you just want to get in as cheap as possible, buy an Infiltec. They have a door for $1900. Blower doors are like anything else, you get what you pay for. Then what happens if HERS or LEED or NAHB or whatever else standard comes out and they mandate 50 pascals without conversion.

Jason Kaylor – JJ
VP of Specialty Products
877/207-1244
AC Tool Supply](http://www.aikencolon.com/)
Fluke Thermal Imagers
Testo 880 Infrared Cameras
Fluke TiR4 Thermal Imager
Fluke TiR 1 Resources](http://www.fluketir1.com/)
Fluke Ti55 Infrared Camera](http://www.fluketi55.com/)
Retrotec Q46 Blower Door](http://www.aikencolon.com/Retrotec-Q46-Air-Blower-Door_p_1636.html)
Energy Audit Talk](http://www.energyauditortalk.org/)

Dan,

Your situation in this would be a little different. You have a $1000 credit on the books with us towards the purchase of a blower door / duct blaster. So you could use that towards the blower door / duct blaster, or towards the training. LEED residential is $595. LEED commercial is $595. BPI through Clean Edison is $1500 or BPI out here in Phoenix is $895.

Jason Kaylor – JJ
VP of Specialty Products
877/207-1244
AC Tool Supply](http://www.aikencolon.com/)
Fluke Thermal Imagers
Testo 880 Infrared Cameras
Fluke TiR4 Thermal Imager
Fluke TiR 1 Resources](http://www.fluketir1.com/)
Fluke Ti55 Infrared Camera](http://www.fluketi55.com/)
Retrotec Q32 Duct Blaster](http://www.aikencolon.com/Retrotec-Q32-Duct-Testing-Blower-System_p_1644.html)
Energy Audit Talk](http://www.energyauditortalk.org/)

I did my training in Phoenix like Jason said and bought a Minneapolis blower door from the energy conservatory, they will discount it with your BPI certification. For me I didn’t feel that I needed to spend a lot of money to get started. Most of the homes I’ll be working on are small, less than 2500 Sq. feet and will be working as a performance contractor with the state. Like anything in this business you are the only one who can determine what your budget will handle, the cope of work you plan on completing and the return on investment. Do your due diligence and it will pay off.

I realize that I am just getting started as a thermographer with Level 1 certification. But, how many home inspectors can afford to purchase a quality imager, pay for training and then buy a blower door with more training? As stated in other posts, it appears that some states and private contractors are providing energy surveys for free or at least less than the average HI fee. It seems that many homeowners would be satisfied to have a thermal scan under the correct delta t conditions. Is it necessary to create abnormal conditions with a blower door?
I respect anyone who has invested the time and money to be the best thermographer and inspector. I’m sure the use of blower doors has merit, but how far do we have to go to produce a quality service?

That is a good question John. It will take you quite a while doing infrared inspections to pay for your imager let alone training for BPI/LEEDS certification and a blower door.

Our state is requiring our electric companies to reduce their usage (sales) of electricity by 1% or more. They will be allowed to charge a premium to the customers who do not reduce their usage. The news reported that the electric companies will be offering home energy audits for free or almost. I believe it will be based on income but I’m not sure. I heard one talking head mention blower door usage for these free energy audits.

The correct answer is: Yes.

However, my answer is that you must only overcome the normal pressures of the building. 50pa is not required for TI to work. You must be able to overcome all neutral and positive pressures from stack effect or you will possibly miss 50% of air infiltration.

This is only about air infiltration. Do not confuse it with the conduction effect due to improper insulation R Value.

I am struggling with your very question, watching and waiting.

Blower doors tell you how much leakage, IR tells you where.

I currently use HVAC equipment to pressurize and de-pressurize buildings.

I am involved with my state’s weatherization program and energy audits with blower doors are mandatory on any home receiving federal money. This included homes being remodeled under the HUD program. I just received 8 bids yesterday and I’m planning on doing my own audits so I don’t have to sub them out.

David,

Do you decline the job if HVAC is not present?

Jason,

I’m interested, but then a flight gets involved and losing inspections for a few days would cost me some big dinero.

I’d like to see this course in my neighborhood, and I’d jump all over it.

Here is the current schedule Clean Edison has going on for the BPI training. http://www.cleanedison.com/BPI-Course-Locations.html . The LEED you will have to wait for anyway because of the way the USGBC has upgraded it. LEED 2.2 ended April 1st, and LEED 3.0 is the new one. I believe that doesn’t start until August. I am not completly caught up on the new LEED standard. There are several versions of it. Clean Edison would be better at consulting as to which would be better for you guys.

I am very sure that New Haven is New Haven CT, but it might be New Haven MA, I will find out today. I will ask them today to put up the state with the city, I am pretty sure there are a 100 Patersons out there.

Jason Kaylor – JJ
VP of Specialty Products
877/207-1244
AC Tool Supply](http://www.aikencolon.com/)
Fluke Thermal Imagers
Testo 880 Infrared Cameras
Fluke TiR4 Thermal Imager
Fluke TiR 1 Resources](http://www.fluketir1.com/)
Fluke Ti55 Infrared Camera](http://www.fluketi55.com/)
Retrotec R31 Duct Blaster](http://www.aikencolon.com/Retrotec-R31-Duct-Testing-Blower-System_p_1643.html)
Energy Audit Talk](http://www.energyauditortalk.org/)

I guess I could of just clicked the link. It is New Haven CT, and the Paterson is in NJ.

Jason Kaylor – JJ
VP of Specialty Products
877/207-1244
AC Tool Supply](http://www.aikencolon.com/)
Fluke Thermal Imagers
Testo 880 Infrared Cameras
Fluke TiR2 Thermal Imager
Fluke TiR Resources](http://www.aikencolon.com/Fluke-TiR-IR-Infrared-Thermal-Imager_p_861.html)
Fluke Ti55 Infrared Camera](http://www.fluketi55.com/)
Retrotec R31 Duct Blaster](http://www.aikencolon.com/Retrotec-R31-Duct-Testing-Blower-System_p_1643.html)
Energy Audit Talk](http://www.energyauditortalk.org/)

I would like to correct a statement made above. All Blower Doors/Infiltrometers are rated on the amount of air that they move through the fan not on the size of the building. The Energy Conservatory fan is rated at 6,000 CFM at 50 Pa. This could be more than adequate for a newly built, tight home of 8,000 sq ft. Or might not be enough for a 1,200 sq ft home that has huge leaks to the outside. Each of the manufacturers of Blower Doors have the ability to add more fans and gauges to work on large commercial buildings. Fans can be stacked in a single frame and will work with a building that has a simple footprint. With complex, multi-floor structures it might be better to use the Blower Doors as singles in multiple doorways to help ensure even pressure distribution.

You can see pictures of multi-fan systems at www.energyconservatory.com.

Hope this information helps.

Frank Spevak
Marketing & Sales Manager
The Energy Conservatory

http://www.energyconservatory.com/products/products1.htm

**Component Specifications | Model 3 Blower Door Fan:****Maximum Flow:**6,300 CFM (free air), 5,300 CFM (at 50 Pa).**Minimum Flow:**300 CFM (Ring B), 85 CFM (Ring C), 30 CFM (Ring D), 11 CFM (Ring E).**Dimensions:**20" inlet diameter, 10.25" length.**Weight:**33 lbs.Flow Accuracy:+/- 3% (using DG-700 or APT system). Rings D and E +/- 4% or 1 CFM, whichever is greater.**Calibration:**Meets ASTM Standard E779-03, CGSB-149.10-M86, EN 13829 and ATTMA TS1.**Power:**110V or 220V.**Adjustable Frame Material:**Extruded Aluminum.**Width:**24" - 40".**Height:**48" - 94".**Seal:**EPDM flexible gasket.**Panel Material:**Nylon w/ built-in vinyl window.**DG-700, APT System:**See Specifications on Digital Pressure Gauges and Automated Performance Testing System pages.

Whats 700cfm amongest friends, hehe.

Frank is absolutely correct with the sq footage numbers. It depends on the situation. My numbers are based on averages, and what an energy auditor will most likely come across. There will be situations where 10k sq ft can be done by any blower door and situations where 1k sq ft would have too much leakage. On the flip side of that, I doubt anyone with a 10k sq ft house that you could get to 50pa with a single fan system probably has a super low energy bill relative to the size of the structure and wouldn’t be calling an energy auditor in the first place. The 1k sq ft structure probably has bigger concerns than air leakage.

Jason Kaylor