reverse polarity

Originally Posted By: cready
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what are the results of having reverse polarity?


Originally Posted By: John Bowman
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Cory,


Let me see if I can answer your question. I'll probably be corrected by the electrical wizards on this bb.

Reverse Polarity occurs whenever the hot and neutral electrical wires are reversed. If an internal fault occurs in the wiring of a piece of equipment, such as a drill or saw, the equipment would start as soon as someone plugs the power cord into the improperly wired receptacle. Also, equipment will not stop when the power switch is released.

Hope this helps.

John


Originally Posted By: jschwartz1
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Cory,


click on this:

http://www.handymanusa.com/articles/polarity.html

And remember on your indicator Green over Red you may be dead!!!


--
Jay Schwartz
Coast To Coast Home Services, Inc
www.Coasttocoasthomeservices.com
Southeast Florida NACHI Chapter - VP www.floridanachi.org
NACHI - Legislative Committee Member
MAB - Member

Originally Posted By: dbowers
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I’ve always just told buyers it will make all men living near them go impotent and senile. After that they always seem to want to get them fixed.


Originally Posted By: Greg Fretwell
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Most people would never know if the outlets were wired backward, in fact polarized plugs and receptacles are really a fairly recent thing. If you look at 60s and even early 70’s appliances you will see both prongs of the plug are the same size.


If the appliance is double insulated it makes no difference and that is why some new things still have unpolarized plugs. Where this does make a difference is when one side of the power line is more likely to be touched than the other. The best example is a lamp. Properly wired lamps have the grounded conductor connected to the threaded shell of the socket so if you choke up on a bulb while you are screwing it in you will not touch the hot side. Back in the olden days TVs and radios might have one side of the chassis connected to one side of the line but, alas that was before polarized plugs were used. Perhaps that was the reasoning of polarized plugs but the transistor pretty much made “hot chassis” machines obsolete before polarized plugs were required.


Now virtually anything “electronic” uses a switch mode powersupply or it runs from a transformer. In either case both input leads will be isolated from the chassis, in fact they don’t even use a chassis anymore. It is just a card.