Tin coated copper wiring

Originally Posted By: phinsperger
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I haven’t been able to find much info on tin coated copper wiring. Does anyone know why they coated the copper? If it was to stop oxidization why did they stop coating it? What era is it found? Any other info?


Don't get fooled into thinking its aluminuim wire. Look at the cut end of the wire. If you see copper its probably tin coated copper.

Paul
Hinsperger Inspection Services


Originally Posted By: Guest
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I’m not 100% positive but I’d bet that tin was used to facilitate soldering in the old knob and tube systems. When knob and tube died so did the tin coating. Chad


Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
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I couldn’t find anything about residential use of tinned copper but here’s some basic information on why tinned copper is used.


http://www.alanwire.com/awscripts/makspecs.cgi?nENGINE=TINNED

Solid soft tinned copper wires are used primarily in applications involving current flow, corrosion resistance, or the need to solder the wire to some component. The addition of a tin coating facilitates the soldering process with only a small price differential over bare copper. A tin coating is also desirable in applications where operating temperatures exceed 100? C up to 150? C. At such temperatures the corrosion resistance of bare copper declines and the tin coating acts to protect the surface of the bare copper.

Single-strand conductors can be tin coated as soft, medium hard or hard wire. The standard minimum thickness of tin coating is 40 micro-inches.

http://www.dockyardelectrics.com/Wire&cable/wire_and_cable.htm

Conductor Coating
Although there are several coating materials used in wire today, the most common is tinned plating. Coating copper wire began over 40 years ago for the primary purpose of speeding and improving the quality of soldered applications. Bare copper oxidizes to form a copper oxide film. Copper oxide film is a poor conductor of electricity. To effectively solder a copper conductor the oxidation must be removed. Tin oxidizes much more slowly than bare copper, it is also of relatively low cost making it the dominant coating material for general purpose applications. Tin coating helps to make a tin-solder connection sound. The corrosion resistance of tinned copper has an added benefit in Marine applications. Harsh, caustic environments that marine vessels can be subject to will quickly undermine a Boat?s electrical system causing loss of conductivity and key component failure. Tin plating extends a wire?s life span considerably.

And here's another, though off topic, one about the history of "Basic Electrical Connectoring". I found it interesting, but the master electricians wandering among us may not.

http://www.pdhonline.org/courses/e123/e123content.pdf


--
Erby Crofutt
B4U Close Home Inspections
Georgetown, Kentucky

www.b4uclose.com

Originally Posted By: phinsperger
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Thanks Erby,


All of the connecton are soldered and wrapped. Still not sure why they would have chosen to put it this particular house. No abnormal corrosion evironment. Just personal preferance I guess.

Paul
Hinsperger Inspection Services


Originally Posted By: jpeck
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Paul,


For many years after knob and tube was replaced by more modern wiring methods, connections were twisted for a mechanical and electrical connection, and then soldered for a 'better' electrical connection. After soldering, they were typically wrapped with friction tape, then a Ty-Wrap (I think that was the name of it) rubber cover installed over them. Eventually, friction tape was replaced with vinyl insulating tape, then solder was eliminated, with modern types or wire nuts being used for the connection and insulation.


--
Jerry Peck
South Florida

Originally Posted By: phinsperger
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Jerry,


A time comsuming process compared to today, but a very good connection from what I have seen.


--
.


Paul Hinsperger
Hinsperger Inspection Services
Chairman - NACHI Awards Committee
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Originally Posted By: JIM WALKER
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Was for soldering.Trouble shooting would have been a b—



JIM WALKER


Tampa FL.


ELECTRICJIMW@AOL.COM