To deliver or not to deliver on site reports

Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
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I saw a note from Chris about delivering on site reports. I didn’t want to hijack that thread so I started a new topic.


I was on the fence about whether I should or should not deliver on site reports.

I heard a lot of arguments both ways.
Pro: You're done with it and can forget about it
Con: You lose an additional marketing opportunity when delivering the report to the real estate agent's office the next day.
Etc, ad nauseum.

The best reason I have heard not to do it right now came from Tom Lauhon, the owner/instructor at the Midwest Inspection Institute ( http://www.midwestinsp.com )in Leavenworth, KS.

He said that a new inspector should NEVER deliver on site reports until the inspector had done at least 300 or 400 inspections. You'd find yourself driving away, get 30 minutes down the road and realize that you "made a mistake" or "forgot to mention something you should have", etc. After you've done that many inspections it didn't really matter as it turned into a personal preference.

I chose to follow that advice because of similar situations in the past. Sure enough, I had it happen to me several times, but could recover without anyone knowing because I had not yet delivered the report.

Your thoughts?

Erby Crofutt
B4U Close Home Inspections
Georgetown, KY
www.b4uclose.com


Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
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I think the marketing advantage of on-site reporting out weighs the damage done from mistakes by rushing to generate the report on-site. Most of your work will one day come from repeat real estate agents. Agents will overlook the typos and mistakes if you can get them out with report in-hand quickly. Time is money for the agent and inspector.


Getting access to the home early allows you to do both, so join your local board of REALTORS as an affiliate and get a lock box pad/key. If you run into any resistance from the board, email me and I’ll contact them for you. My old company at www.peachinspections.com are the kings of on-site reporting using digital photos, pre-written sections, two inspectors, two notebook computers and color printers on every inspection. About 10% of the agents won’t use them because they are too fast. But the other 90% love them because they’re fast. Play the odds.


Nick


Originally Posted By: Chris Morrell
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I agree with Nick, but I also think that Erby (or Tom Lauhon) has got a good point. Everyone at peach was/is a very experienced inspector, with plenty of inspections between them. The 300 limit doesn’t really play into that example.


It's hard to say. I think the on-site inspections are very impressive, but if you think you might miss something because of it by ALL MEANS don't do it. If you can do it well, I think they're great, but a good home inspection comes first.


--
Chris Morrell
Director of Information Technology
http://www.nachi.org/

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Originally Posted By: jmyers
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On site reports go over well with realtors because it gives them more time to talk to the client and decide what they really want to ask for. It makes sense when you think about the fact that timing is an important part of the transaction.


I do point out to my clients that I am there mostly looking for the big things that are wrong and they should expect they will have to spend some money on routine maintenance. The smaller things are included for thier convenience mostly to give them an overall picture of what area's of the home have been neglected and/or need attention.

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: Nick Gromicko
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Joe Myers:


Your wife is a big REALTOR. Mostly a buyer's agent, right? How much importance does she place on "on-site" report generation when choosing an inspector?

Nick


Originally Posted By: lfranklin
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This might not make much cents. But I give 2 reports 1 verbal a 1 written.


The on site verbal gives them the chance to decide what to ask for the written report will have all that information plus what you forgot on site


Originally Posted By: jmyers
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Nick,


According to most agents I have spoken with, on site reports are at the top of the list. This is mostly because buyers wait until the last minute to schedule the inspections and if they have to wait a few extra days for the report they may not get the reply to the inspection completed on time.

Joe Myers


Originally Posted By: dbush
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I try to do a summary report that is basically a written quick summary of what I have gone over with the clients at the end of the inspection. That way everyone is not sitting around waiting for my ancient typing and computer to come together. It does say that this is only a brief synopsis of items of interest (it used to say deficiencies, but I changed that) and that they should refer to the full report for all findings, that way if I remember something later or find something on one of the pictures, it is still listed. Dave



Dave Bush


MAB Member


"LIFE'S TOUGH, WEAR A HELMET"

Originally Posted By: Michael M Djokovich
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Thank you for the tip on Inspectornews.com It’s a whole bunch more info to digest ended up crosseyed after hours of really good discussions and advice kinda like extra helpings at the meal table between this one and Inews Quick Question : where can I get more info on codes and relativty to home inspect



Does anyone have any leads on Job opps. arround the So.Jersey/ Philly area, Due to NJ’s legislature any opp’s outside in the tri-state will be welcomed maybe we can make a match ( ETA in NJ last week may '03)

Originally Posted By: rmeyers
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Grumpy,


Ref. Code Books: I personally like the "Code Check" series for my general code guidelines. They're compact, easy to carry to job site, page indexed by topics, with sketches. They also now offer a video series to go with them. I haven't seen the videos but looks like good companion series. Available through several of the trade equipment magazines. Got mine through "Professional Equipment". www.professionalequipment.com

Would also recommend a current set (many of the codes are ammended every 3 years) of Code books as used by the major local authorities in your area. (Code can vary widely within adjacet jurisdictions.) These often come in handy for "in depth" research and confimation of issues. If you can quote a Section and Paragraph out of the local code to back up your side of an issue it has a way of cutting short the debate!

I'm out of Champaign, IL and our City Building Inspection / Code Enforcement Department sells, at cost, copies of all the code books and their amendments as adopted by the City.

GOOD LUCK!!


--
Russ Meyers

Originally Posted By: ecrofutt
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I’ve found Professional Equipment to be kind of high on most stuff. I’ve usually saved a bit by spending a few more minutes researching different sources.


Erby Crofutt
B4U Close Home Inspections
Georgetown, KY
www.b4uclose.com


Originally Posted By: rmeyers
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Grumpy,


What Erby says about Professional Equipment is true. Shop around! Especially on tools and hardware. Check your local paint stores for moisture meters; electrical, plumbing & heating supply houses for detector equip. and even the local discount home centers for significant savings on many items.


--
Russ Meyers