Trash Compator Power cord?

Originally Posted By: Kevin Blackwell
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I am in search of the min. length for a trash compactor power cord?


I was able to find the max. length of 72" in the 2003 IRC but it didn’t


indicate a min.


Thx Kevin from Houston, Texas


Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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Quote:
Built-in Dishwashers and Trash Compactors.

Built-in dishwashers and trash compactors shall be permitted to be cord-and-plug connected with a flexible cord identified as suitable for the purpose in the installation instructions of the appliance manufacturer where all of the following conditions are met.

(1) The flexible cord shall be terminated with a grounding-type attachment plug.

Exception: A listed dishwasher or trash compactor distinctly marked to identify it as protected by a system of double insulation, or its equivalent, shall not be required to be terminated with a grounding-type attachment plug.

(2) The length of the cord shall be 0.9 m to 1.2 m (3 ft to 4 ft) measured from the face of the attachment plug to the plane of the rear of the appliance.

(3) Receptacles shall be located to avoid physical damage to the flexible cord.

(4) The receptacle shall be located in the space occupied by the appliance or adjacent thereto.

(5) The receptacle shall be accessible.



--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm

Originally Posted By: DGrattan
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I would question as to why you would care about the minimum if you know the maximum length? As long as yu can plug it in without it being in a strain and it was less than 6 feet. I would say the minimum should be enough to plug it in!!


Of course - thats my opinion - I could be wrong.


Originally Posted By: jwortham
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It would need to be a minimum length so it could be safely slid out for whatever reason.


Cord too short and it unplugs. That's ok. It just wont work.

Pulled out just enough to still make contact and yet not be securely seated?

Lots of heat and a melted, shorting outlet.


Originally Posted By: dbowers
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In the IRC 2000 Code Book on page 483 of Chapter 40 under Table E4001.3 it lists the minimum and maximum length od flexible cords for disposals, dishwashers and trash compactors.


For the compactor 36" is min - 48" is max.

That has also been a test question on several state licensing exams (like Texas) and on several national HI association entry exams, and on some ICC, ICBO or BOCA code certification tests.


Originally Posted By: dedwards
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Wonder what would happen if a cord was only 35" long yet long enough to plug in without straining…Hmmmm


Originally Posted By: roconnor
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dedwards wrote:
Wonder what would happen if a cord was only 35" long yet long enough to plug in without straining....Hmmmm

For a new install it would not meet the code requirements. For an existing install not a big deal in my book.
I guess ya have to "draw the line" somewhere ... ![icon_wink.gif](upload://ssT9V5t45yjlgXqiFRXL04eXtqw.gif)


--
Robert O'Connor, PE
Eagle Engineering ?
Eagle Eye Inspections ?
NACHI Education Committee

I am absolutely amazed sometimes by how much thought goes into doing things wrong

Originally Posted By: jtedesco
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I supplied the specific NEC rule that answers the question.


When asked by the Attorneys, during the trial for the reasons why a family was burned to death because of a loose cord cap on a cord that was not as long as required by the UL Standard, the answer of less than 3 feet will lead to the next question:

Who replaced the cord?

Just the facts and the way in which I interpret the rules both for new and existing installations and replacements.


--
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

www.nachi.org/tedescobook.htm