Unlicensed Inspectors

I am about to get my state license here in Oklahoma. My question is how are a ton of my competitors some of the highest reviewed people not even licensed through the state? Out of 10 people I looked up maybe 3 of them had their state license. How do they go this long without someone finding out?


Michael McKnight
mmcknight3InterNACHI®️ CPI

4h

I am about to get my state license here in Oklahoma. My question is how are a ton of my competitors some of the highest reviewed people not even licensed through the state? Out of 10 people I looked up maybe 3 of them had their state license. How do they go this long without someone finding out?


I guess one could call them and ask them or call the state issuer, or just continue about one’s business. :flushed::+1::thinking::smiley:

If it was me I’d anonymously be reporting unlicensed activity to the state dept in charge.
Just want only licensed competitors on the same playing field.

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Hey Michael,

There are a lot of older inspectors in Oklahoma that may have been “grandfathered” in prior to licensing requirements. That said, if there are inspectors practicing without being licensed, that’s an issue. We are required by the state Construction Industries Board to put our license # on all marketing materials. As you get “up and running”, use the fact that you are licensed as a marketing advantage…

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Money! We are getting ready to start licensing in Ohio. According to what I read, the state actually does not have the funds to actually go after anyone. In my city, they make all kinds of laws, but have no one to enforce them. As mention already calling helps. In Ohio, most of the time a termite inspector is caught without a licence someone called it in. At the end No Man Power!

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Makes you wonder if Just maybe???..The Consumer may be a better Judge of whom the Quality Inspectors are…and Not “The State”. (I’m guessing you mean those with the highest ratings, not with most reviews.) I know a lot of people want to think licencing has something to do with the quality of the inspection the consumer is going to receive, But I see no evidence of that. Insurance Companies are Pros at assessing risk and from what I see, the cost of insurance for an inspector in a state that does not require licencing is no more than in states that are heavily regulated and or require a licence.

My experience with state licencing is that it is a revenue source for the state and also provides a paper trail to make sure other taxes are paid (that is what most of the questions involve when getting a licence “where do you send your taxes”)…has little to do with protecting the consumer…and as other have mentioned, they don’t go after unlicensed “people” unless it will bring in more revenue to the state in the form of fines.